The Vegan Society EU ban on meaty names for veggie food products

first_imgThe Vegan Society has highlighted the proposed measures will not only impact vegans, but also public authorities that currently serve vegan food, such as government departments, health providers, education establishments, police forces and prisons.It has legally challenged the plans in a formal letter to EU officials, signed by its CEO and prepared by a legal expert, on the grounds of breaching fundamental human rights of vegans that are set out by the Union.The letter states the proposed measures contravene the EU consumers’ right to be informed adequately as to how goods can be used and denies the vegan community the benefits offered by EU law on clear labeling.If the proposals are voted into effect next month, vegan and veggie burgers could become ‘discs’, and sausages ‘tubes’ among other products.George Gill, CEO at The Vegan Society who signed the letter, said: Dr Rowley quotes in the letter the European food labeling laws that state “food information should … enable consumers to identify and make appropriate use of food” and argues the use of ‘meaty’ names informs the consumer how the plant-based products can be cooked and used. The 14-page letter includes an appendix with over 100 examples of plant-based food descriptors being used in the public and private sectors, suggesting many institutions would be affected.Public authorities are obliged to provide plant-based food to vegans in their care as veganism is a protected philosophical belief under the Equality Act 2010.Excessive amounts of time and money would have to be unnecessarily spent on revising menus in public sector institutions if the proposals are accepted.Dr Jeanette Rowley, Vegan Rights Advocate at The Vegan Society, said: This proposed measure is not aligned with EU policy on respect for diversity.It is not in the public interest and, if implemented, would have a disproportional impact across society by affecting the normal daily functioning of all public and private entities that provide food.This EU measure threatens to cause widespread administrative chaos, confusion and time wasting trying to understand how to plan a meal that includes a veggie disc or a veggie tube!The widespread impact of this unreasonable and costly proposal should not be underestimated.” Apr 23 2019A vegan charity has warned the proposals to ban the use of traditional names like ‘burger’ and ‘sausage’ for vegan and veggie food products will result in “excessive administrative burdens” to all public entities. As consumers are increasingly moving away from eating animals, the demand for vegan products is growing. There’s no denying that meat, dairy and egg industries are feeling threatened by this and desperately trying to restrict the marketing of vegan products.These proposals have little to do with consumer protection and instead are motivated by economic concerns of the meat industry. We are calling on EU officials to reject these irrational measures for vegan meat alternatives to be banned from using the qualified conventional terms everyone has been using for decades.” Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’sVegans are often deficient in these four nutrientsThe Vegan Society dismissed what it sees as unlawful proposals, calling them “an attempt to bolster a depressed agricultural economy” and warned they would “create confusion across the EU” if put in place.It argued the proposed measures do not achieve the required threshold for implementation as the EU rules recognize that “any limitation of fundamental rights must respect the principle of proportionality and meet objectives of general interest”.The rights and equality provisions available to the vegan community have not been included in the assessment of the validity of the proposed measure, which has not, according to the charity, taken into account all relevant stakeholders in the EU community.Alternative vocabulary put forward such as ‘vegetable disc’ does not constitute clear food labeling under EU consumer law because such terms do not describe or facilitate ease of interpretation, nor make it easy to perceive the food item in question.The EU has 21 days to respond to the letter, after which the matter will be escalated by The Vegan Society.Source: https://www.vegansociety.com/whats-new/news/eu-ban-%E2%80%98meaty%E2%80%99-names-would-financially-impact-public-sector-not-just-veganslast_img read more

Intermittent fasting may protect against type 2 diabetes

first_imgUnder certain genetic conditions, the accumulation of fat in the pancreas may play a decisive role in the development of type 2 diabetes.”Professor Tim J. Schulz, head of the Department of Adipocyte Development and Nutrition Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 2 2019Intermittent fasting is known to improve sensitivity to the blood glucose-lowering hormone insulin and to protect against fatty liver. DZD scientists from DIfE have now discovered that mice on an intermittent fasting regimen also exhibited lower pancreatic fat. In their current study published in the journal Metabolism, the researchers showed the mechanism by which pancreatic fat could contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.Fatty liver has been thoroughly investigated as a known and frequently occurring disease. However, little is known about excess weight-induced fat accumulation in the pancreas and its effects on the onset of type 2 diabetes. The research team led by Professor Annette Schürmann and Professor Tim J. Schulz of the German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE) has now found that overweight mice prone to diabetes have a high accumulation of fat cells in the pancreas. Mice resistant to diabetes due to their genetic make-up despite excess weight had hardly any fat in the pancreas, but instead had fat deposits in the liver. “Fat accumulations outside the fat tissue, e.g. in the liver, muscles or even bones, have a negative effect on these organs and the entire body. What impact fat cells have within the pancreas has not been clear until now,” said Schürmann, head of the Department of Experimental Diabetology at DIfE and speaker of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD).Intermittent fasting reduces pancreatic fatThe team of scientists divided the overweight animals, which were prone to diabetes, into two groups: The first group was allowed to eat ad libitum – as much as they wanted whenever they wanted. The second group underwent an intermittent fasting regimen: one day the rodents received unlimited chow and the next day they were not fed at all. After five weeks, the researchers observed differences in the pancreas of the mice: Fat cells accumulated in group one. The animals in group two, on the other hand, had hardly any fat deposits in the pancreas.Pancreatic adipocytes mediate hypersecretion of insulin In order to find out how fat cells might impair the function of the pancreas, researchers led by Schürmann and Schulz isolated adipocyte precursor cells from the pancreas of mice for the first time and allowed them to differentiate into mature fat cells. If the mature fat cells were subsequently cultivated together with the Langerhans islets of the pancreas, the beta cells of the “islets” increasingly secreted insulin. “We suspect that the increased secretion of insulin causes the Langerhans islets of diabetes-prone animals to deplete more quickly and, after some time, to cease functioning completely. In this way, fat accumulation in the pancreas could contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes,” said Schürmann.Significance of pancreatic fat for diabetes preventionCurrent data suggest that not only liver fat should be reduced to prevent type 2 diabetes. Related StoriesUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol useNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsSome people treated for type 1 diabetes may have monogenic diabetes, study findsIntermittent fasting could be a promising therapeutic approach in the future. The advantages: it is non-invasive, easy to integrate into everyday life and does not require drugs.Intermittent fastingIntermittent fasting means not eating during certain time slots. However, water, unsweetened tea and black coffee are allowed around the clock. Depending on the method, the fasting lasts between 16 and 24 hours or, alternatively, a maximum of 500 to 600 calories are consumed on two days within a week. The best known form of intermittent fasting is the 16:8 method which involves eating only during an eight-hour window during the day and fasting for the remaining 16 hours. One meal – usually breakfast – is omitted.Islets of LangerhansThe islets of Langerhans – also referred to as islet cells or Langerhans islets – are islet-like accumulations of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. A healthy adult has about one million Langerhans islets. Each “islet” has a diameter of 0.2-0.5 millimeters. The beta cells produce the blood glucose-lowering hormone insulin and make up about 65 to 80 percent of the islet cells. When blood glucose levels are elevated, these secrete insulin into the bloodstream so that the levels are normalized again. Source:Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZDJournal reference:Schulz, T.J. et al. (2019) Pancreatic adipocytes mediate hypersecretion of insulin in diabetes-susceptible mice. Metabolism. doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2019.05.005.last_img read more