No case for cancelling or postponing Tokyo 2020, World Health Organization tells IOC

first_imgInternational Olympic Committee (IOC) Coordination Commission chairman John Coates has claimed the World Health Organization (WHO) has told the body there is “no case” for cancelling or postponing Tokyo 2020 because of the coronavirus outbreak. Loading… A host of events in numerous sports, including qualifiers for Tokyo 2020, the Formula One Grand Prix in Shanghai and the World Indoor Athletics Championships in Nanjing, have been cancelled, postponed or moved outside of China because of the outbreak. “We received the report on the task force implemented by Tokyo 2020, its coordination with the task forces implemented by the National Government and the Tokyo Municipal Government and their relationship with the Japan health authorities,” Coates said following the conclusion of a two-day project review of Tokyo 2020. “And pleasingly, there has been very, very good coordination between the two, sharing of information, which is so critical. “Certainly the advice we’re received externally from the WHO is that there’s no case for any contingency plans or cancelling the Games or moving the Games.” Tokyo 2020 President Yoshirō Mori, who reiterated Coates’ comments today, criticised suggestions the Games could be cancelled because of the coronavirus outbreak as “irresponsible rumours” after the first day of the project review. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe promised earlier this month that the country would “respond appropriately” and work closely with the WHO to ensure preparations for Tokyo 2020 are not affected by the virus. Read Also:IOC face ‘big communications job’ as virus jitters hit Tokyo Olympics Tokyo 2020 chief executive Toshirō Mutō, however, admitted last week that he was “seriously worried that the spread of the infectious disease could throw cold water on the momentum toward the Games”. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Coates claimed the IOC was confident “we’ll be able to ensure that the Games go ahead in a way that’s safe for the athletes and spectators” because of cooperation between the Tokyo 2020 virus task force and other authorities involved. The senior IOC member also insisted most Chinese athletes have been preparing for the Olympics and Paralympic Games overseas, and would therefore not need to be quarantined when they arrive in Japan. Concerns over the impact of the coronavirus, given the official name of COVID-19 by the WHO, on the Games in the Japanese capital have grown in recent weeks. The death toll has risen to 1,380, according to Chinese authorities, while there are nearly 64,000 infections in the country. Japan yesterday reported its first death from the virus, which originated in Wuhan, and there are over 251 cases in the Olympic and Paralympic host nation. A total of 218 of these are linked to a cruise liner quarantined in a Japanese port. Promoted Content10 Popular Asian Actresses That Look IrresistibleWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Is This The Most Delicious Food In The World?The Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 TV Shows That Got Better After A Major Character Had LeftA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombslast_img read more

From the bench to ‘the Tank’

first_imgBefore Frank Kaminsky helped lead Wisconsin to a Final Four, was named the most outstanding player of the West Regional, was a first-team All-Big Ten selection or broke a 48-year old scoring record, he rode the bench.Much like many Wisconsin players before him, Kaminsky had to bide his time behind upperclassmen while developing in Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan’s system.“You scold to mold. You praise to raise,” Ryan said in a press conference in Anaheim, Calif. during the Sweet 16. “You have to be honest with them. You can’t tell that kid sitting with the remote on the couch eating potato chips bag by bag and telling him he’s the greatest thing that ever lived without kind of mentioning that maybe you ought to get off the couch.”Coming to Wisconsin from Benten Academy in Lisle, Ill. Kaminsky stood at 6-foot-10, still growing into a frame that would eventually top out at 7-feet. A late growth spurt allowed him to play the guard positions in high school where he was able to develop ball-handling skills and a soft touch.Picking up these skills would prove to be key traits in his success later on.“He had passing skills, pretty good foot work, things like that,” Ryan said of what he saw in Kaminsky in high school. “So to get to be 7-feet tall and then still have those skills, that’s helped us.”During his freshman and sophomore seasons, Kaminsky averaged just nine minutes per game while sitting behind forwards like Jon Leuer and Jared Berggren.Learning behind players at his position that received All-Big Ten team selections during their careers at Wisconsin gave Kaminsky a strong foundation to his development as a player.“He had a chance to play behind some other guys that he learned from in Jared Berggren and in a lot of practices with guys like Keaton Nankivil, Jon Leuer who is with Memphis now,” Ryan said. “So he’s had a chance to be around some guys that could help him. He listens.”Heading into the 2013-2014 season, the junior forward looked to be next in line to take over the Wisconsin front court with both Berggren and Ryan Evans leaving vacancies down low for the Badgers.Although he was primed to become the starter and would soon embark on a season that would make a mark on the Wisconsin history books, Kaminsky was still a relative unknown.“I had no idea who Frank was coming in because he was playing behind [Berggren] who was a great player for them,” freshman forward Nigel Hayes said. “But, I knew Frank could shoot the ball and I knew that he was skilled. But Frank is actually a lot better than I was told.”With an opportunity finally presenting itself for Kaminsky to make contributions to the team, he was determined to make the most of it.“I knew that this year there would be an opportunity for me to go out there and play a lot of minutes, and I just wanted to do anything I could to be a big factor on this team,” Kaminsky said.It wouldn’t take long for him to become a “big factor” as he would lead Wisconsin in scoring in a three-point win over UW-Green Bay in the third game of the season, which he followed up with a 43-point performance against North Dakota to put himself in the program’s record book and on the national map.In the 33 games after his record setting performance, Kaminsky has failed to reach double digit scoring or rebounding just seven times.In Wisconsin’s last 13 games, Kaminsky has averaged 17.9 points and 6.9 rebounds per game.Ryan attributes his 7-footer’s success to his growth both as a player and a person.“He’s growing into his body, mentally, physically, socially,” Ryan said. “They tell me he’s funnier than he used to be, and his eyes are more wide open now. Last year I thought at times his eyes were closed, then I realized that’s just his eyes. If you see him sitting sometimes you think, oh, look, Frank’s asleep. He’s not asleep. But he’s got that sleepy look. But he’s matured in every aspect because he’s worked hard.”With a top-10 standing in rebounding, blocks and field goal percentage in the Big Ten this season, Kaminsky became a first-team All-Big Ten honoree. He was the only Badger to earn a first-team selection this season.Kaminksy’s versatility has been a big part of why he has been successful this season. With the ability to stretch defenses out to the perimeter and a quick first step to the rim, he presents a mismatch for most opposing teams.“Frank’s the man. I know that some of the guys say that I’m a mismatch nightmare, but Frank is really even a better one in the fact that when he’s guarded by a true seven-footer it’s almost illegal for him to play against them,” Hayes said. “The fact that usually their feet are no where near as good as Frank’s, so when he’s out on the perimeter, if he just puts the ball on the ground it’s always a foul because they can’t slide with him. Inside, with his great footwork, he can get you up off of the ground and score anyway he wants. That’s just Frank being Frank.”But it has been his emergence in the NCAA Tournament that has caught the attention of the country and has even put him in the conversation as a possible NBA prospect.In Wisconsin’s four wins in the tournament, the junior is averaging 18.5 points per game and six rebounds per game while shooting 54 percent from the floor.That pales in comparison to his performance in the West Regional final against No.1 seed Arizona, where he scored a game-high 28 points to go with 11 rebounds to send Wisconsin to its first Final Four since 2000.Kaminsky’s 28 points was the second-highest scoring total by a Badger in the NCAA Tournament, behind only Michael Finley who scored 36 points in 1994, earning him the Most Outstanding Player award in the West regional.“We always knew Frank had it in him, we just had to get it out of him,” sophomore forward Sam Dekker said. “He’s been carrying us this whole season.”last_img read more