Georgia Hall and Nikki Foster share Hampshire Rose

first_img18 Apr 2012 Georgia Hall and Nikki Foster share Hampshire Rose Curtis Cup reserve Georgia Hall and Lancashire’s Nikki Foster were the joint winners of the Hampshire Rose with 36-hole scores of one-under par. The event was played on a bitterly cold day at North Hants Golf Club and the start was delayed due to early morning frost. But the players defied the conditions with some fine golf. Georgia Hall (Remedy Oak) had the low score of the day with her second round of four-under par 69. She was joined at the top of the leaderboard by Nikki Foster (Pleasington) who shot 70 in the afternoon. It was the second year in a row that the trophy has been shared. Georgia, 16, is an England international and a reserve for the Curtis Cup match which will be played at Nairn in June. Nikki, 20, has also represented England and last year qualified for the Women’s British Open. In third place was Abigail Laker (Frilford Heath) who, earlier this month, became the first girl to win the North Hants Junior Open. She pipped Daisy Dyer (Chigwell) who had set the early pace with a morning score of 72, one under par. Leading Scores: Par 73, SSS 73, CSS 75, 75     145 Georgia Hall (Remedy Oak) 76 69, Nikki Foster (Pleasington) 75 70   147 Abigail Laker (Frilford Heath) 73 74, Daisy Dyer (Chigwell) 72 75 149 Chelsea Masters (Highwoods) 74 75   150 Charlotte Thompson (Channels) 78 72, Hannah Barwood (Knowle) 77 73, Emma Allen (Meon Valley) 74 76 151 Tara Watters (Muswell Hill) 75 76 152 Rachel Drummond (Beaconsfield) 74 78 153 Danielle Anderson (Rochford Hundred) 76 77 154 Lauren Blease (Burhill) 79 75, Dulcie Sverdloff (Garon Park) 78 76, Kerry Smith  (Waterlooville) 76 78 155 Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth) 79 76 157 Elizaveta Nikulina (Effingham) 77 80 159 Georgia Gilling (Rochford Hundred) 80 79, Georgina Mundy (Dunwood Manor) 76 83last_img read more

Half-time: West Ham 0 Fulham 0 – woodwork saves Whites at Upton Park

first_imgFulham were saved by the woodwork in a lively first half at Upton Park.With both teams’ under-pressure managers needing a victory, West Ham dominated the early stages and almost went ahead when Mark Noble’s right-wing free-kick was headed against the post by Modibo Maiga.Martin Jol’s Fulham, who have lost four matches in a row, were also relieved to see James Collins’ header from Stewart Downing’s corner drift wide.Adel Taarabt started for the Whites in place of the absent Dimitar Berbatov and the visitors are again without Brede Hangeland.Taarabt looked dangerous at times as Fulham threatened on the counter-attack, but Sam Allardyce’s side continued to have the upper hand and Downing brought a save from Maarten Stekelenburg with a fierce 25-yard strike.Mohamed Diame and Kevin Nolan then missed decent chances to put the Hammers in front.Fulham (4-4-1-1): Stekelenburg; Zverotic, Hughes, Amorebieta, Richardson; Duff, Sidwell, Parker, Kasami; Taarabt; Bent.Subs: Stockdale, Senderos, Ruiz, Kacaniklic, Karagounis, Boateng, Dembele.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Plants Outsmart Darwin

first_imgThere are wonders in plants that continue to be uncovered with the tools of science.  Two recent papers in PNAS lend support to the feeling that plants are smarter than assumed.Trash collection:  Humans usually only employ one trash collection service, but plants have two.  Four Chinese investigators found redundant pathways in plant cells for removing misfolded proteins.  Writing in PNAS,1 they characterized endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD), “an integral part of the ER quality-control system that removes toxic misfolded proteins via ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation” (see 11/24/2010).  They found two genes that “function redundantly” to ensure this essential process does not fail.  The genes are conserved (unevolved) in yeast, plants, and humans.Portable generators:  Humans know it is handy to have a power source, like a battery, when you’re away from the power grid.  Plants know that, too.  German scientists found that plants use potassium as a local energy source in their vessels.  Here’s what their abstract said in PNAS about how plants exploit the multi-functional potassium ion.2The essential mineral nutrient potassium (K+) is the most important inorganic cation for plants and is recognized as a limiting factor for crop yield and quality.  Nonetheless, it is only partially understood how K+ contributes to plant productivity.  K+ is used as a major active solute to maintain turgor and to drive irreversible and reversible changes in cell volume.  K+ also plays an important role in numerous metabolic processes, for example, by serving as an essential cofactor of enzymes.  Here, we provide evidence for an additional, previously unrecognized role of K+ in plant growth.  By combining diverse experimental approaches with computational cell simulation, we show that K+ circulating in the phloem serves as a decentralized energy storage that can be used to overcome local energy limitations.They called this the “potassium battery.”  They described how the model plant Arabidopsis “taps this ‘potassium battery,’ which then efficiently assists the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in energizing the transmembrane phloem (re)loading processes.”Neither paper explained how these systems might have evolved.  The paper on ERAD degradation of misfolded proteins only mentioned that the genes are conserved, and speculated in passing about the functional differences of the ERAD genes in plants vs humans.  Another PNAS paper by Harvard biologists, however, did speculate about misfolded proteins as a source of evolutionary innovation.3  Studying how yeast cells handle misfolded proteins, they recognized that there is a fitness cost involved, as if an oarsman suddenly disabled on a rowing team makes the others have to work harder.  What does this have to do with evolution?  Not much, apparently, and maybe less: it appears to constrain evolution, not advance it:These results underscore the distinct and evolutionarily relevant molecular threat of protein misfolding, independent of protein function.  Assuming that most misfolded proteins impose similar costs, yeast cells express almost all proteins at steady-state levels sufficient to expose their encoding genes to selection against misfolding, lending credibility to the recent suggestion that such selection imposes a global constraint on molecular evolution.Selection against misfolding is a form of stabilizing selection – a “running in place” process that tries to maintain the status quo, not the kind of evolution Darwin envisioned.  If most mutations lead to toxic misfolded proteins, plants need to be smart enough to get rid of them quickly and systematically, not tinker with them in random searches for new functions.    One can look in vain in this paper for any suggestions supporting old Darwinian ideas of progress, tinkering or innovation.  Quite the contrary: “Our study illustrates the value in isolating and quantifying the consequences of protein misfolding to understand their relative contributions to molecular evolution and cell biology,” they said in conclusion.  “The results support hypotheses that assume that misfolded proteins impose a selective cost independent of protein function and a model of protein quality control in which a small interacting set of proteins responds specifically to misfolded proteins in the eukaryotic cytosol.”  In the set of “hypotheses that assume that misfolded proteins impose a selective cost,” is there any reason to exclude intelligent design?1.  Su, Liu, Xia, Hong, and Li, “Conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system to eliminate mutated receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pas.1013251108.2.  Gajdanowicz et al, “Potassium (K+) gradients serve as a mobile energy source in plant vascular tissues,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1009777108.3.  Geiler-Samerotte et al, “Misfolded proteins impose a dosage-dependent fitness cost and trigger a cytosolic unfolded protein response in yeast,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1017570108.These papers have intelligent design shouting and Darwin whimpering.  Respect your garden by acknowledging the design so clearly evident, and honoring the Designer.  Don’t insult your plants by thinking they got where they are by unguided, directionless, chance processes of evolution.  It would be like insulting professionals for a job well done by shrugging your shoulders and saying, “Stuff happens.”(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The Real Problem With The Windows 8 User Interface – And It Isn’t Touch

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#imac#Mac#touchscreen#user interface#user interface design#Windows 8 IT + Project Management: A Love Affair I just finished setting up my second Windows 8 computer. The first one, a Lenovo Yoga ultrabook/tablet, has a touchscreen. The second one, a Lenovo desktop tower, is hooked up to a standard Dell flat-panel LCD monitor that I bought a few years ago.While I installing the last piece of software on my new tower, I read Brian Profitt’s ReadWrite post about the current infatuation with touchscreens (see Hey PC Industry: Stop Being So Damn Touchy-Feely).But my experiences have convinced me that the ride into the new Windows 8 world is not going to be that bad. And more to the point, the touchscreen interface isn’t the biggest issue.Touch Is Not the ProblemThe problem is not that Microsoft is dragging us kicking and screaming into the world of touch interfaces.The real challenge is more complexity. To a certain extent I see some similar challenges – albeit on a smaller scale – in Apple’s Mac OS X Lion. They both offer too many different ways of accomplishing the same thing.One of the first things that I do when setting up a Windows computer is to get rid of the free trial subscription to some bloatware security program. Windows Defender is free and has worked well for me. We all know security programs have big enough egos that using two at the same time will cause problems.Uninstalling a program on Windows requires you to go to the Control Panel. That used to be fairly straight forward on Windows 7 and earlier operating systems. You went to the Start Menu. When I tried setting up my first Windows 8 computer, I had not figured out that you could get to the Control Panel multiple ways. Even once I figured it out, I learned that getting there was context-sensitive – and confusing.Complexity With Strange OptionsIf I am on the Windows 8 Start screen with the tiles and I move my mouse or finger to the upper right corner of the screen, the soon-to-be-famous Windows 8 “charms” come out. One is Settings – which you might think would take you directly to the control panel, but it doesn’t. At least not in that context.When I am using a regular Windows desktop application like Firefox, going to the upper right corner of the screen also reveals the charms. Select Settings here and you will find the Control Panel listed as the number two item on the right of your screen.Just to make it a little more confusing, if I am running an application like Google’s Chrome in its Windows 8 mode when I do the same thing, the Settings charm that shows up is for Google Chrome – and there is no Control Panel anywhere around. However, if I run Google Chrome in desktop mode, the Setting’s charm that shows up does lead to the control panel.As I was working on my new tower PC, I also discovered that if you go to the lower left corner of your screen and right click with your mouse, you will get a pop-up menu which has the Control Panel.It would be far easier have one simple, consistent way to get to the control panel. It does not matter to me if I get to it with the mouse or my fingers. That choice I can handle. Among my current choices I will likely remember going to the lower left corner and right clicking. It makes the most sense to me.When I first started using Mac OS X Mountain Lion, I had some similar concerns. If I want to open and application, I am not exactly sure why I need Launch Pad, the dock on my screen, recent applications under the Apple menu, the Finder sidebar, and the ability to double click on an application icon. However, I have learned to ignore the ways that don’t work for me.Learning Curve On Windows 8 Not So BadThat’s slowly happening with Windows 8, as well. When I started working on my first Windows 8 system, I got so frustrated that I finally installed Start8 from Stardock. It gave me back the old Start Menu and let me gradually become accustomed to Windows 8. I did not bother installing Start8 on my second system. I learned enough to not need it. (For more, see Could Restoring The Windows 8 Start Button Fix Everything?)Having used Windows 8 very successfully with a mouse, I’m not very concerned about being stuck if the touchscreen capability is not there in a system. The Intel Core i5 Windows 8 desktop tower that I bought came with a 1TB hard drive and 8GB of memory and a nice keyboard. The cost before taxes was $499. That is a lot of computer for less than $500. Who cares it if doesn’t have a touchscreen?All-In-One Computers Are WastefulI am more worried about all-in-one computers than touch interfaces. I have seen some reports that LCD screens could last for up to 20 years. We all know that even the best of computers become functionally obsolete in three to five years. If you buy an all-in-one computer, your screen is going to outlast your computer by more than a decade.Our family has purchased seven iMacs since 1998. All have been retired except my iLemon which is just waiting for my new Mac Mini’s arrival to give up the ghost. All the screens were functioning perfectly when we gave up on the computers and recycled them.When my new MacMini shows up this week it will be hooked up to an Apple 20-inch flat panel Cinema Display that I purchased in December 2004 for close to $1,000. I suspect the old screen will outlast the new MacMini. The iMac I bought in 2010 will be our last all-in-one computer.Touchscreen Price/Reliability Not A Big IssueI doubt that touchscreen pricing and reliability are issues that are going to heavily weigh on the success of Windows 8. Touchscreens have proven themselves in some very rugged scenarios and the prices are dropping quickly.The key point for the Windows 8 user interface isn’t worrying about too much dependence on touch vs. the mouse. It’s about whether the user interface is simple to use and doesn’t confuse us with too much choice.So far I am not enthusiastic about the latest releases from either Microsoft or Apple in that regard. Maybe I will go have a look at KDE in the Linux world. It is hard to believe that Linux has come so far that I might be looking at it as relief from Mac OS X or Windows 8, but who knows?Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Related Posts center_img 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now david sobotta Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

Trumps blow to Obamacare jolts health consumers politics

first_imgWASHINGTON – President Donald Trump’s abrupt move to cut off federal payments to insurers jolted America’s health care and political worlds alike on Friday, threatening to boost premiums for millions, disrupt insurance markets and shove Republicans into a renewed civil war over their efforts to shred “Obamacare.”Defiant Democrats, convinced they have important leverage, promised to press for a bipartisan deal to restore the money by year’s end. That drive could split the GOP. On one side: pragmatists seeking to avoid political damage from hurting consumers. On the other: conservatives demanding a major weakening of the Affordable Care Act as the price for returning the money.“The American people will know exactly where to place the blame,” declared Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., all but daring Trump to aggravate what could be a major issue in the 2018 congressional elections.The money goes to companies for lowering out-of-pocket costs like co-payments and deductibles for low- and middle-income customers. It will cost about $7 billion this year and help more than 6 million people.Ending the payments would affect insurers because President Barack Obama’s law requires them to reduce their poorer customers’ costs. Carriers are likely to recoup the lost money by increasing 2018 premiums for people buying their own health insurance policies.The National Association of Insurance Commissioners estimates that Trump’s move would produce a 12 per cent to 15 per cent upsurge in premiums, while the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has put the figure at 20 per cent. That’s on top of premium increases from growing medical costs.Experts say the political instability over Trump’s effort to undermine Obama’s health care law could also prompt more insurers to leave markets. As Trump frequently points out, next year about half of U.S. counties will have only one insurer on “Obamacare’s” online marketplaces, up from the one-third of counties with one carrier in 2017.Trump relished his latest blow against the law that he pledged to repeal during his presidential campaign, only to see the effort crash in the GOP-run Senate this summer. He’s long derided the subsidies as bailouts to insurers, even though the payments and the cost reductions for consumers are required by law.The scrapping of subsidies would affect millions more consumers in states won by Trump last year, including Florida, Alabama and Mississippi, than in states won by Democrat Hillary Clinton. Nearly 70 per cent of the 6 million who benefit from the cost-sharing subsidies are in states that voted for the Republican.“Congress, they forgot what their pledges were,” Trump told conservative activists at the Values Voter Summit, recalling GOP candidates’ repeated vows to repeal Obama’s law. “So we’re going a little different route. But you know what? In the end, it’s going to be just as effective, and maybe it will even be better.”On Twitter Friday night, he wrote: “Money pouring into Insurance Companies profits, under the guise of ObamaCare, is over. They have made a fortune. Dems must get smart & deal!”Trump’s move was hailed by conservative groups including Heritage Action for America and Freedom Partners, backed by the Koch brothers.But rallying against it were medical and consumer groups including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians and insurance industry behemoths America’s Health Insurance Plans and Blue Cross Blue Shield Association.Nineteen Democratic state attorneys general are suing Trump over the stoppage. Attorneys generals from California, Kentucky, Massachusetts and New York were among those who filed the lawsuit in federal court in California to stop Trump’s attempt “to gut the health and well-being of our country.”A federal judge has found that Congress never properly approved the payments. The subsidies have continued under Obama and Trump until now, despite prior Trump threats to block them.Schumer told reporters that Trump’s “threats and bullying are not going to work.” He said he saw a good chance of forcing money for the cost sharing reductions into a massive spending bill Congress is expected to approve late this year.Democrats think Trump would have little clout to block a bipartisan deal, citing support for the payments by some Republicans and polls showing the public would fault the GOP for any failure. Some Republicans privately agree.“Now, President Trump has his fingerprints all over the knife,” said Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, who heads Senate Democrats’ campaign committee.In a survey released Friday by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation, 7 in 10 said the administration should help Obama’s law work, not undermine it, including nearly half of Republicans. The same group conducted an August poll showing 6 in 10 people would blame Trump and the GOP for future health care woes.Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., have been seeking a deal that Alexander said in a recent interview would reinstate the payments for two years. He said in exchange, Republicans want “meaningful flexibility for states” to offer lower-cost insurance policies with less coverage than Obama’s law mandates.Republicans are divided over that effort.Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., who leads the conservative House Freedom Caucus, said in an interview that he’s willing to back the payments if they’re “part of a transition from Obamacare to something else” with greater state flexibility than Alexander and Murray are discussing. Another conservative leader, Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., said the payments should be revived “under no circumstance.”Some GOP leaders have expressed openness to continuing the payments, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who’s said he wants them accompanied by significant changes. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, said this summer that the payments should be continued, citing their impact on premiums.Moderates like Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said Friday that halting the payments would make insurance costs “unaffordable for some people.” Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., tweeted that the cuts “will mean more uninsured in my district.”___AP reporters Ken Thomas and Jill Colvin contributed.last_img read more

SC order quashing RBI circular to give relief to power cos but delay bankruptcy proceedings

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court order quashing a Reserve Bank of India circular on resolving bad debt will provide relief to power companies and lenders as well as flexibility to restructure debts but will slowdown bankruptcy proceedings, experts said Tuesday. The Supreme Court on Tuesday quashed RBI’s February 12 circular, which prescribed rules for recognising one-day defaults by large corporates and initiating insolvency action as a remedy. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Vishrov Mukerjee, Partner, J Sagar Associates said after the Supreme Court judgment, the RBI may have to issue revised guidelines/circulars for the restructuring of stressed assets. “There is also a question mark over existing processes which may have been completed/nearing completion,” he said. “However, with the threat of IBC proceedings mitigated, it will give some breathing space to power companies and lenders as well as flexibility to restructure debts in a manner which ensures continuity and value maximization for lenders as well as power companies.” Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Cyril Shroff, Managing Partner, Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas, termed the ruling as a major development that shows how “proactive” the judiciary has been. “Whilst it’s too early to say but if banks voluntarily still invoke IBC – the practical impact will be minimal,” he said. ICRA senior vice president Sabyasachi Majumdar said the Supreme Court decision is likely to result in a further slowdown in the already tardy pace of resolution of stressed assets in the power sector. “This apart, the resolution process is in any case subjected to regulatory risks as exemplified in the case of the Prayagraj Power asset, where the regulator has given a recent directive for a discount in PPA tariff while allowing the shareholding change approval for the same,” he said. The RBI had on February 12, 2018, issued a circular on the resolution of stressed assets revised framework — commonly known as February 12 circular. According to the circular, lenders had to classify a loan account as stressed if there was even a day of default. The bankers had to mandatorily refer all accounts with over Rs 2,000 crore loans to the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) or the bankruptcy court if they failed to resolve the problem within 180 days of default. Lenders were supposed to file an insolvency application under the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code 2016 within 15 days of the completion of the 180-day deadline. The circular also withdrew the loan resolution mechanisms the RBI had implemented, such as Corporate Debt Restructuring and Strategic Debt Restructuring. Power sector was the worst hit by the circular and so were companies in steel, textile, sugar and shipping sector. GMR Energy Ltd, RattanIndia Power Ltd, Association of Power Producers (APP), Independent Power Producers Association of India, Sugar Manufacturing Association from Tamil Nadu and a shipbuilding association from Gujarat moved different courts against the circular. The power sector argued that outstanding loans of Rs 5.65 lakh crore (as on March 2018) were a result of factors beyond their control such as unavailability of fuel and cancellation of coal blocks. The Supreme Court Tuesday held that the circular was ‘ultra vires’ — meaning it went beyond the scope of what the RBI can do when coming up with rules and regulations. Mukerjee said the Supreme Court verdict along with recent government decisions implementing the recommendations of the High-Level Empowered Committee will provide much needed respite and impetus to regulatory reform in the power sector.last_img read more

‘139 FIRs and DD entries against political parties’

first_imgNEW DELHI: As many as 139 FIRs and daily diary (DD) entries have been registered till date against various political parties and others for violation of the model code of conduct in the run up to the Lok Sabha polls, the poll body in Delhi said on Wednesday. The statistics surveillance team of Delhi’s Chief electoral office constituted to keep an eye on the expenses of political parties, has seized Rs 1.38 crore in cash and also seized 266.318 kg of narcotics and drugs. “A total of 139 FIRs or DD entries have been lodged till date in connection with the violation of the model code of conduct,” Delhi EO Ranbir Singh told reporter Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”Out of these, 15 are against the Aam Aadmi Party(eight FIRs and seven DD entries), 19 against the Bhartiya Janata Party (nine FIRs and four DD entries), four against the Congress (all DD entries), one against the Bahujan Samaj Party (one DD entry), Samajwadi Party (one DD entry), and 95 against others or non-political (entities),” the CEO office said. The office of the Delhi CEO said more than 2.87 lakh posters, banners and hoardings have been removed since the poll code came into force. “As many as 29,3809 posters, banners and hoardings were removed from all over Delhi, out of which 30533 aree removed from the New Delhi Municipal Council, 43,075 from East Delhi Municipal Corporation areas, 2,411 from Delhi Cantonment Board, 11 8456 from South Delhi Municipal Corporation, and 99,334 from North Delhi Municipal Corporation areas,” the statement said.last_img read more

Football How will Ohio State stop Maryland running back Ty Johnson

Ohio State junior linebacker Jerome Baker (17) sacks Army senior quarterback Ahmad Bradshaw during the second quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorWith just over one minute to go in a tie game, Maryland junior running back Ty Johnson took a handoff at the Minnesota 34-yard line, spotted a hole and raced through it past defenders for the game-winning touchdown.This is the exact type of rush Ohio State will attempt to prevent Saturday when the Buckeyes face off with the Terrapins at Ohio Stadium. This season, Johnson has 46 carries for 411 yards, an average of 8.93 yards per carry, which ranks him No. 4 in the FBS. A big-play threat, Johnson has gained at least 34 yards on a carry five times in his team’s four games this year, including a 74-yard touchdown in Week 2 against Towson. “He’s got great acceleration, he really can go,” Ohio State linebackers coach Bill Davis said. “When he gets going, he’s got great acceleration and he’s got good vision and patience. He’s a good back.” Johnson rushed onto the scene as a freshman when he averaged 7.1 yards on 35 carries. The 5-foot-10, 208-pound running back followed up his debut last season with 110 carries for 1,004 yards, an average of 9.1 yards per carry, the most by a Terrapins player in a season with at least 100 rushes. Prior to this year, Johnson was placed on the Doak Walker Award watch list.“He’s a real good back,” senior defensive end Jalyn Holmes said. “He’s got a big heart, man. He plays a lot bigger than what he actually is, so we’ve got to be ready for him.”Johnson is tied with sophomore running back Lorenzo Harrison III with a team-high 46 carries, but Johnson averages twice as many yards per carry as Harrison. The Buckeyes defense has not given up many long runs this year. The only 34-plus yard rushes came against the second-team defense in the third quarter of blowouts of UNLV and Army, both of whom are top 10 rushing offenses in the FBS. In the season opener, Indiana averaged 0.6 yards per carry without a rush over nine yards and the next week, Oklahoma averaged 2.8 yards per carry and did not run for a gain of more than 13 yards.In order for the success against the run to continue, Ohio State understands it must play disciplined as Johnson and Harrison are apt to bounce plays to the outside if they do not see holes in the middle. “They bounce it out, they run around, they don’t even hit their hole, they sometimes bounce it out and those are fast guys and we’re just going to have to contain them,” redshirt senior defensive tackle Tracy Sprinkle said.Davis and defensive line coach Larry Johnson emphasized defenders at all levels of the defense must maintain their gap responsibility and not over-pursue, noting it would be the key to victory.“I think the two running backs are dynamic,” Larry said. “I think they’ve both got great vision. They can cut on a dime.”Johnson’s speed is even more important now than in the first couple weeks of the season due to Maryland’s struggle to keep quarterbacks healthy. The Terrapins are down to third-string quarterback Max Bortenschlager as Tyrrell Pigrome and Kasim Hill suffered season-ending torn ACLs. Therefore, they will likely rely heavily on their run game to produce scoring drives and churn the clock against Ohio State.A unit featuring five players who are at least 6-foot-3 and weigh more than 300 pounds will pave the way for Johnson. Though the Terrapins do not have a single senior on their offensive line, all linemen are in their second seasons as starters. Redshirt junior right tackle Damian Prince, who stands 6-foot-3 and weighs 315 pounds, leads the line as this is his third season as a starter.“It’s going to be a good test for us,” Holmes said. “They have a great offensive line. They’ve got a great running back.” read more

Football Ohio State stays at No 10 in College Football Playoff rankings

The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the start of the game against Michigan State on Nov 10. Ohio State won 26-6. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorFollowing a 26-6 victory against then-No. 18 Michigan State, Ohio State (9-1, 6-1 Big Ten) remain at No. 10 for the third straight week in the latest College Football Playoff rankings.With the Spartans fell out of the overall rankings, the Buckeyes join No. 4 Michigan, No. 14 Penn State, No. 22 Northwestern in the playoff rankings, giving the Big Ten four teams in the Top 25.On Sunday, Ohio State moved down a spot in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll and the Amway Coaches’ Poll to No. 9 and No. 8, respectively.No. 10 Ohio State faces Maryland on the road at noon on Saturday.Here are the full current rankings:1.) Alabama2.) Clemson3.) Notre Dame 4.) Michigan5.) Georgia6.) Oklahoma7.) LSU8.) Washington State9.) West Virginia10.) Ohio State11.) UCF12.) Syracuse13.) Florida14.) Penn State15.) Texas16.) Iowa State17.) Kentucky18.) Washington19.) Utah20.) Boston College21.) Mississippi State22.) Northwestern23.) Utah State24.) Cincinnati25.) Boise State read more

PSG enter the race for Fred

first_imgParis Saint-Germain have reportedly joined Manchester United in the race for the Brazilian midfielder Fred this summer, claims Manchester Evening NewsThe Shakhtar Donetsk player has been a subject of interest for both United and local rivals Manchester City throughout the season, although it is believed that the latter has now officially ended their interest in signing Fred.However, the free-spending PSG have joined United after deciding that the 25-year-old would make a valuable addition to their squad.The Ligue 1 champions are currently looking for a mobile defensive midfielder in order to ease the burden that has been placed on Adrien Rabiot’s shoulders this term.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…Vice-captain Thiago Motta is now 35 years old and the 33-year-old Lassana Diarra left PSG in the January transfer window for Abu Dhabi outfit Al-Jazira.Shakhtar is unwilling to allow Fred to leave for nothing in the summer with the Brazilian’s five-year deal with the Ukrainian club including a release clause of €60m.Although United may be prepared to match the asking price due to Marouane Fellaini’s uncertain future and captain Michael Carrick’s retirement.last_img read more