NORWICH CITY VS MAN CITY,

first_imgNORWICH (4-1-4-1)RUDDY,PINTO, KLOSE,MARTIN, BRADY,O’NEIL,REDMOND, HOOLAHAN, HOWSON, NAISMITH,JEROMEAGUERO, BONY,SILVA, TOURE,FERNANDINHO, NAVAS,CLICHY, OTAMENDI, KOMPANY, SAGNA,HARTMANCHESTER CITY (4-4-2)Manchester City are 10 points behind Barclays Premier League leaders Leicester City and, with Tottenham Hotspur without a game and Arsenal in FA Cup quarter-final action, at home to Watford, City can move into third spot with a win at Carrow Road.After this game, City entertain Dynamo Kiev in the Champions League then have another home game, against rivals and neighbours Manchester United in the Premier League.However, City’s 15 league wins include 10 at home and only five away while they have just 13 goals on the road; their previous fewest goals on the road is 17, in 2005-06 and 2007-08. In each of the last two season’s City have scored 39 away goals.When the teams met in October, City needed a late Yaya Toure penalty to beat Norwich and stay top of the Premier League. Nicolas Otamendi’s header put the hosts in front, before Joe Hart inexplicably dropped the ball at the feet of Cameron Jerome for a Canaries equaliser.A frantic finale followed, as Toure scored from the spot after Russell Martin’s red card for handball. And before the end Aleksandar Kolarov missed a penalty.And in January City won 3-0 in the FA Cup at Carrow Road. Sergio Aguero scored in that tie to maintain his record of always scoring when he starts against Norwich. So far the Argentine has played five full games against the Canaries, scoring a total of six goals.Norwich test Sebastien Bassong, Robbie Brady, Andre Wisdom and Steven Naismith but Alex Tettey is out for the season. City, meanwhile, are still missing Kevin De Bruyne, Fabian Delph and Samir Nasri.last_img read more

John Gerdeman passed away

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Earl John Gerdeman, 85, of Delphos, died at 3:55 pm on July 17, 2015, at St. Rita’s Medical Center surrounded by his loving family. He was born January 3, 1930, on a farm near Middle Point, Oh to Edward and Helen (Renner) Gerdeman. He married Doris Meyer on June 23, 1956; she survives in Delphos at the Sarah Jane Living Center. Other survivors include a sister, Janice Kaskocsak, of Dayton; a brother, Bill (Mary) Gerdeman, of Delphos; a brother in-law, Carl (Ida) Meyer, of Columbus; a sister-in-law, Lorene (Louis) Jettinghoff, of Delphos; and sister-in-law, Marilyn (Gary) Elsass, of Sidney, Oh. Additionally, he was loved and will be greatly missed by many nieces and nephews and great-nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by a sister, Ella Mae Gogel; infant brother, Robert Cletus; and brothers-in-law, Kenneth Gogel, and Valentine Kaskocsak. Earl graduated as valedictorian of the Middle Point High School class of 1948. He attended The Ohio State University and received both Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Vocational Agriculture. He taught Vocational Agriculture at the former Payne High School until being drafted to the United States Army in 1952. He then taught Vocational Agriculture for 35 years at Lincolnview High School until his retirement in 1989. During his time in the United States Army, he went to Blacksmith School and taught blacksmithing to soldiers being sent to Korea. He continued this job until his discharge in 1954. He used these skills to teach blacksmithing to other agriculture teachers around Ohio for the State Board of Education. Earl was a lifelong farmer who loved to share his passion for agriculture. He was also an avid gardener and enjoyed sharing his produce with neighbors and friends. He was a loyal fan of the Lincolnview Lancers and Cincinnati Reds. He also enjoyed attending ballgames of his many great-nieces and nephews, and rarely missed a game. In 2013, he received the Ohio Farm Bureau Distinguished Service Award. In addition, he received the American FFA Degree, was named Outstanding Agriculture Teacher for the state of Ohio and was a past Ambassador Club member for the Ohio Farm Bureau. He also served on the governing boards of the Van Wert County Hospital, Midwest Electric Cooperative and Van Wert County Farm Bureau. He was a member of the Delphos St. John’s Knights of Columbus. He volunteered yearly for Van Wert County’s Cows and Plows event, teaching young students about farm history and old fashioned agriculture. Additionally, he mentored young farmer and adult farmer organizations. He was a lifelong member of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Delphos, where a Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Tuesday, July 21, at 1:30 pm. Fr. Charles Obinwa will be officiating. Burial will be in St. John’s Cemetery following the Mass. Full Military Grave Rites will be performed by the Delphos Veterans’ Council. Family and friends may call from 2:00 pm until 8:00 pm on Monday, July 20, at Harter and Schier Funeral Home where a Parish Wake will be held at 2:00 pm. Memorial contributions may be made to the Earl J. Gerdeman Scholarship Fund at Linconlview High School or the Alzheimer’s Association. To leave condolences, visit harterandschier.com.last_img read more

Chot Reyes blasts Gilas after loss to Alab in tuneup

first_imgChot Reyes. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netGilas Pilipinas coach Chot Reyes minced no words in blasting his wards following their 81-76 loss to Alab Pilipinas in a exhibition game Saturday at Meralco Gym.“We sucked big time. If we play like this we better not even go to Japan, we have no chance,” a disappointed Reyes said.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ “We better find a way to fix that. Hopefully, we have enough time. That’s something we need to fix, even before we think about Japan.”Reyes commended Alab, which he think dominated Gilas in all aspects of the game during their scrimmage.“Credit to Alab, they came in they were very prepared. They outplayed us, they outfought us, they outhustled us, they outshot us. I can’t think of one positive thing in today’s ballgame,” he said.Help is on its way for Gilas with naturalized player Andray Blatche set to arrive on Monday.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman: I was abused by doctor Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion View comments LATEST STORIES With one week of practice already under its belt, the Philippine national team struggled to fend off Alab, .Only Jayson Castro and June Mar Fajardo were able to crack double-digits for Gilas, which allowed Alab import Reggie Okosa to have his way down low in the closed-door tuneup game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutGilas was listless and Reyes didn’t have the gall to point out any silver linings from the exhibition game less than two weeks before the 2019 Fiba World Cup qualifying duel against Japan on November 24 in Tokyo.“No positives at all. We need to improve on a lot. We need to learn how to play basketball. With the way we played, we looked like we don’t know how to play basketball. We can’t shoot, we can’t defend, we can’t rebound,” he said.last_img read more

Modern parenting demands accessible father

first_imgA crisp Saturday morning in Baroda, and around 150 men have turned up to chat and mingle. It’s not just any conference. Fathers all, they have been roped in by their employer, ABB Ltd, the power and automation giant, to hear Rajalakshmi Sriram talk about fathering. Set amidst the sprawling,A crisp Saturday morning in Baroda, and around 150 men have turned up to chat and mingle. It’s not just any conference. Fathers all, they have been roped in by their employer, ABB Ltd, the power and automation giant, to hear Rajalakshmi Sriram talk about fathering. Set amidst the sprawling expanse of Maneja on the outskirts of the city, everything has an ultramodern sheen. But the chic wood-and-steel dcor, which usually crackles with professional energy, looks laidback and carefree today. Colourful posters hang on every corner, pushing for “child-plus-plus” attitude. Sriram, who teaches at the department of human development and family studies in MS University, belongs to the rare breed of scholars exploring the idea of fatherhood in modern India. She begins her PowerPoint slideshow: “Are You an Effective Father?” The dads fidget and cough.Himanshu Chakrawart , 40, COO, ChennaiTalk about catching the moment. If career moms’ struggles make daily headlines, the buzz around fatherhood is getting louder. “Women’s liberation has slowly but surely changed the context and substance of men’s lives,” points out psychoanalyst Sudhir Kakar. And dads, as the Baroda session indicates, are rising to the challenge. Expressing regret at not being able to balance work and fatherhood, they are talking about the need to be more involved with their children and trying to renegotiate their lives to allow for effective parenting. An ACNielsen survey this year revealed 74 per cent Indian men do not want work to take up all their time. And 50 per cent crave more time with family. Says Kakar, “This is one of the most striking changes associated with modernity in India”-a theme that underpins his just-released book, The Indians: Portrait of a People. In the West, a similar ferment saw the birth of Men’s Studies a decade back, questioning traditional forms of masculinity. In India, too, a redefinition of fatherhood seems to be underway.Why are dads stressed out?advertisementNew economic forces, such as global competition, create an increasingly fluid job market. It demands committed employees at a time when loyalty is low. Salaries are zooming, but hiring and firing are easier. Dads work longer hours to prove their indispensability.Shoulder more responsibility and risk or slide down the economic ladder, says the market. It prefers nimble, younger people with constantly adaptable skills. Dads are under pressure to acquire new skills and work towards a greater future.Invasive technology-from vibrating BlackBerrys, always-on Internet connectivity, to midnight teleconferencing with colleagues abroad-makes it harder for dads to detach from work at home.More moms enter the workforce.For every five men, there is one woman who works in an income generating activity in urban India today. Dads are left scrambling to become the full-fledged co-parents their wives now need them to be.Modern parenting, post-globalisation, demands a more accessible father. Families are child-centric, children don’t hold dads in awe. Fathers are not expected to be just the providers and disciplinarians. Caught between old values and new, dads are confused.The biggest pressure on dads comes from the new competitive global economy. The fluid job market makes more demands and fewer promises. “It requires people to shoulder more responsibilities and risk,” says Himanshu Chakrawarti, 40, COO of Landmark in Chennai, and an overstretched dad, “People are willing to work longer hours for a better future.” Office space has also become more comfortable and conducive for work. “The intrusion of technology-the Internet, e-mails and mobile phones- makes it harder to detach from work,” points out the IIT-IIM alumnus.And the family bears the brunt. For many years, a 40-something operations executive with HSBC (who spoke on condition of anonymity) played by his hard-driving boss’s rules-“living at work”, as he describes it. Then one weekend, his young son fell and cut his knee. To his shock and dismay, the child refused to let the father comfort him. In fact, he treated him like a stranger. The event was a turning point. Although fearful for his job, he approached his boss and said that he had let slip the singlemost important priority in his life-a close relation with his son.”Judge me by the quality of my work, not the amount of time I spend in office,” he said. The request led to an uproar, but it probably helped the bank put people first. HSBC today is one of the few companies in India with employee-friendly, flexible policies.Guilt and regret are the by-word in many a dad’s life. Take a day in the life of Rajeev Ramachandra, 40, of Bangalore. As founder of Mistral Software, an embedded software product company with offices around the world, he’s on call 24X7. He logs in at work by 9 a.m. and leaves almost 12 hours later, bringing work home every day and working for at least two hours. That leaves him with an hour or so of free time, when he tries to relax, have his evening meals and spend time with his children. This, mind you, is one of his better parenting days. Nearly three weeks every quarter he’s on tour. “I feel I don’t give my children enough time. I try hard to keep my weekends free for them,” Ramachandra says ruefully.advertisementConsider L. Viswanathan, 35, partner with leading Mumbai law firm Amarchand & Mangaldas. His work easily takes up 14 hours on a weekday, most Saturdays and sometimes Sundays. Nearly four times a month it takes him away from home. “It’s painful when your little girl cries and clings to you every morning to stop you from going to work,” he says. Little Sivaranjani runs a moody eye over her dad: “Daddy is always in office.”A gaggle of similarly harried men stream through the consulting room of Dr Aniruddha Deb, a psychiatrist in Kolkata. “Most of them have winning careers, are in their late 30s or 40s, work round the clock, spend long hours in office, are busy on the BlackBerry or the Internet at home, and often on the phone with colleagues across the seas at unearthly hours.” In most cases, the “index patients” are children. Fathers come either because children’s “grades are falling”, or they are getting “difficult to handle”. But in the course of counselling it often appears that it’s the father’s physical or mental absence that’s at the root of the crisis.The ‘overstretched dad’ is undoubtedly a by-product of modern parenting. “It’s the shifting contours of the post-globalisation family that have created new circumstances for modern parents,” says sociologist Radhika Chopra of Delhi University. Fifty years ago, parenting was simpler for men. As the sole breadwinner, a dad’s responsibilities typically ceased the moment he crossed the threshold of his home. The father was more aloof and emotionally more detached. The breakdown of the joint family has lessened the father-child distance. The modern father, Chopra points out, “is no longer the patriarch at home”.BlackBerry vibrates. Call from dad’s US office for a meeting via teleconferencing. A deal needs to be finalised by following day. Dad struggles to go back to sleep. 6.30a.m.Alarm goes off. Dad wakes up groggy and decides to go for a jog. Fires off SMS-es to his staff before sprinting into the crosswalk with his i-Mate. Perfect time to grab the boss’s ear. 7:15a.m.Dad wakes the kids up for breakfast, catches the news on the telly, keeps an eye on the toddler and takes a look at 10-year-old son’s class project. Rushes to get ready for office. 9:30a.m.Dad logs in at office. Late by a half hour today. Got delayed by his baby crying and clinging on to his trouser leg. Nasty traffic snarl in front of older boy’s school, too. 7:30p.m.advertisementConference call with the US office ends. Dad feels obliged to go out for a drink with colleagues and clients. He calls it a day and logs off. 9 p.m.Dad arrives home. About an hour of playtime. Dad cuddles, reads stories, listens and also supervises math homework. He tries to relax and takes his meal. 10 p.m.Children in bed. Dad brings work home during the week (tries hard to keep the weekends free). He tries to wrap up a project for his forthcoming tour.Dad and mom watch television for a while. Dad usually finds it hard to switch off. But tonight, dad is out like a light the moment his head touches the pillow.The result is that the idea of the family, the hierarchy within it and the expectations from it are turning upside-down. “Kids don’t seem to hold fathers in awe anymore,” points out Dr Jitendra Nagpal, consultant psychiatrist with VIMHANS, Delhi. “Families are much more child-centric now and children are quick to grasp this.” He has had disgruntled teenagers telling him, “My father is a Sunday Father. I see him only on Sundays.” In a study conducted this year on 1,460 adolescents by VIMHANS, children’s disappointment with fathers comes across clearly: 73 per cent prefer to discuss issues troubling them with friends, and only 13 per cent with parents. They cite an absentee father as the reason for shunning the parental ear. In yet another VIMHANS study in 2005, teachers across the country claimed, 70 to 80 per cent of fathers do not turn up at parent-teacher meetings in schools. Kolkata’s Harshvardhan Neotia, 45, doesn’t remember the last time he attended a parent-teacher meeting. The industrialist rues that he is proba-bly one of those Sunday fathers for his 11-year-old twins, Parthiv and Paroma: “I’m lucky if I can say ‘hi’ to them on weekdays.” But the son has started asking for more time these days, says his wife Madhu: “As a solution, Harsh sometimes takes Parthiv to office.” Meantime, Neotia continues to be plagued by remorse: “There are some men who can take care of everything and still be home for dinner. I never seem to manage it.”The sense of guilt pushes some men to overcompensate children with expensive gifts. Chakrawarti, for example, recently bought a toy-scooter scooter for Rs 5,000 on his three-yearold daughter Anaya’s birthday (“She knows how to get me to say yes to everything”). Deb narrates the case of a father whose plastic parts business with Tata Motors left him with no time in hand. To compensate, he would ‘bribe’ his teenage son with a car, unlimited pocket money, even membership access for playing golf at his club. The son did not misbehave or lose interest in studies. “He just lost interest in his parents,” says Deb, “He was totally detached from anything at home.” The father made serious efforts to build bridges, but it was too late to reinvent the wheel. Psychiatrist N. Rangarajan of Chennai is not surprised. “It’s a common mechanism for fathers to compensate for their absence from home,” he says, “but very often it harms the way a child grows up and forms relationships as an adult.”Rajeev Ramachandra, 40, Mistral Software, BangaloreMuch more alarming is the way new research quantifies the effects of this physical or emotional absenteeism. In March, British scientists analysing thousands of babies born around the turn of the millennium claimed that children with absentee fathers score lower on tests of empathy, reasoning and brain development. They behave more aggressively, are more likely to have trouble forming relationships and are more reluctant to take responsibility for misbehaviour.In 2002, the US National Center for Policy Analysis had concluded such children were up to three times more likely to engage in a criminal activity, and a 1993 Harvard study had showed that the amount of time a father spent with his children could affect their ability at math and sports.The bottom line is, fathers are in conflict. Sriram calls them “transient, confused fathers” caught between changing worlds: “They were brought look at childcare as a woman’s job, they received no training in fathering, and they are confused about the longterm effects of adopting modern ways.” Studies show how conflicting ideas of parental roles within the family create further confusion. Sociologist G.N. Ramu of the University of Manitoba in the US has analysed how for many Indian women allowing a man to take up childcare violates their self-image as competent mothers and wives. In 2005, when Sriram interviewed 50 parents in Baroda, 38 per cent cited job context (lack of time, work pressure) for not being an active parent; 30 per cent mentioned “unsuitable temperament” and “lack of skills” to be an effective father; 21 per cent rooted for the fathers’ tendency to “escape from certain tasks” easily.What cuts away the ground beneath men’s feet further is the entry of women in the workforce. For every five men, there is one woman who works in an income-generating activity in urban India today. Having two incomes may have brought economic benefits to countless families and given women opportunities for fulfilment, but it has left men scrambling to become the fullfledged co-parents their wives now need them to be. A study shows that Indian men today pitch in 16 hours a week in housework-up from 1.2 hours in 1965. But the real crunch lies elsewhere for professional couples with matching incomes. “The sense of masculinity, more than fathering, goes up for re-negotiation,” says Chopra. Take Chakrawarti and his wife Raka, a PR professional. While she believes he should spend more time with their child, he thinks he does his best: “My wife may not agree with me, but I play with my daughter, read her stories and take her out whenever I can.””Whenever I can” is the operative phrase and professional economist, Omkar Goswami, feels most dads are overstretched because they don’t know how to prioritise their time. “Even at Infosys, which is known for its productivity, 95 per cent of men leave office by 7.30 p.m.,” says the man who figures on the board of directors of the company. “The legendary Narayana Murthy, founder of Infosys, always had the time to mentor his daughter’s education.” It also has to do with the New Age notion of ‘the complete man’, feels professor Mangesh Kulkarni of the University of Pune, who’s also the convener of the Forum for the Study of Men & Masculinities. There is a greater “civil privatism” in men’s lives today-“a withdrawal into the shell of private, family life and activities centred on shopping and consumption, rather than public engagements on which men used to spend a good deal of their time and energy earlier.”L.Viswanathan, 35, partner, Amarchand Mangaldas, MumbaiYet, for most fathers, salvation lies in the world of work. While the concept of progressive programmes is catching up worldwide, there is no law in force in India which entitles a father to balance work and home. A random check reveals that most corporates grant paternity leave for as little as two days to a maximum of three months. But already there are murmurs of change. HSBC bank has initiated measures-childcare centres to flexi hours to longer paternity leave. NDTV is a rare media company that provides for crches. The IT sector, home to the ‘best employers’ in India, is pushing for incentive packages, which include paternity leave. Some, like ABB, include fathering in social responsibility agenda.The easiest formula for men to improvise ways of boosting the time they spend with their children is to learn from their working spouse and be more like a woman. A tough call in a macho Indian society, made tougher in today’s highly competitive work culture, where staying late at work is considered a sign of an employee’s status and importance in a company. For most dads it’s the menopause syndrome all over again-does he pause at work and spend more time at home or will that mean losing out on the fatter paycheck, the fancier car, the promotion? Till that dilemma is resolved, the tribe of Transient Confused Fathers can only increase.last_img read more

Where’s Cinderella? Favorites dominating in NCAA 2nd round

first_imgCayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess The lowest-seeded team to reach a regional semifinal Saturday was No 5 seed Auburn, which routed Kansas, a No. 4. That should change Sunday as five double-digit seeds are in action, though they don’t consider themselves long shots.“We’re a 31-5 team that’s played against high-level competition all year, and we’ve had great road victories throughout the season,” UC Irvine guard Robert Cartwright said. “And we don’t see ourselves that way (as a Cinderella). But we understand that might come with our seeding, but we look at ourselves as a high-level team that can compete with pretty much anybody.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsAt least one double-digit seed will get to the Sweet 16 because Cartwright’s 13th-seeded Anteaters face No. 12 seed Oregon in a South Region matchup Sunday in San Jose, California.Oregon hardly fits a Cinderella profile as a Pac-12 program, even though it needed to win its conference tournament just to crack the 68-team field. Big West champion UC Irvine is a more natural fit; the Big West champion won its first NCAA Tournament game Friday and has even embraced the approach Loyola-Chicago took last year by labeling an assistant coach as its version of Sister Jean Delores Schmidt. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Even before Saturday’s action, the lowest-seeded team left in the tournament was UC Irvine.The Anteaters have won 17 straight games and earned their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history Friday with a 70-64 triumph over Kansas State.“I look at their ballclub, and it reminds me of some of our good Creighton teams back when we were in the (Missouri) Valley (Conference),” said Oregon coach Dana Altman, who coached Creighton from 1994-2010. “We never thought of ourselves as Cinderellas or underdogs, and I’m sure they don’t either. So they don’t think of themselves as Cinderella, and I sure don’t.”Another potential Sweet 16 upstart is Liberty, the No. 12 seed in the East Region.Liberty rallied from 10 points down in the second half Friday to beat Mississippi State80-76 for its first NCAA Tournament victory. The Flames faces No. 4 seed Virginia Tech on Sunday at San Jose.“We’re not getting too ahead of ourselves,” Liberty forward Myo Baxter-Bell said. “We don’t really look at the numbers. I think seeds don’t matter. I think it’s been proven that the numbers really don’t matter. At the end of the day, we all have to go out there and lace up.”Ohio State, seeded 11th in the Midwest region, takes on No. 3 seed Houston in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Iowa is seeded 10th in the Midwest and seeks its first regional semifinal berth in two decades when it faces No. 2 seed Tennessee.Although neither team is a double-digit seed, it still would be quite a development if Buffalo gets to the Sweet 16 out of the Mid-American Conference or Central Florida gets there in its first NCAA Tournament appearance since 2005.So there are still many opportunities for Cinderella stories, even if the teams involved might not care for that description.“That’s the great thing about this tournament,” UC Irvine coach Russell Turner said Saturday. “You get to settle it in a rectangle. And what your seed is doesn’t matter. You play for it. And that’s what we’ll get a chance to do tomorrow. So if they call us Cinderella, that’s fine. But I think we’ve earned everybody’s respect, whatever they call us.” PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Murray State’s Ja Morant (12) looks up at the scoreboard during the first half of a second round men’s college basketball game against Florida State in the NCAA Tournament, Saturday, March 23, 2019, in Hartford, Conn. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)Fletcher Magee shot Wofford out of the NCAA Tournament. Murray State’s Ja Morant scored 28 points but his team couldn’t slow down Florida State.Their exits leave the Sweet 16 searching for a Cinderella.ADVERTISEMENT Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving MOST READ Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Google Philippines names new country director Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon eventcenter_img Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting UC Irvine will try to accomplish what Wofford and Murray State failed to do.Wofford’s 21-game winning streak ended as the Southern Conference champions fell 62-56 to Kentucky. Magee, the NCAA career leader for 3-point baskets, missed all 12 of his attempts from beyond the arc.“It’s incredibly disappointing,” Magee said. “I feel like if I make three of those shots, we win the game. You know, a lot of them were good shots, and just — they didn’t go in.”Morant kept Murray State close for the first 10 minutes or so before No. 4 seed Florida State blew out the 12th-seeded Racers 90-62 in a West Region second-round game.“I was just hurt not being able to take the floor with these guys for the rest of this season, for another game, or possibly two, three, four,” Morant said. “But it’s been a great season. I really was just thinking back on what all we have accomplished this year.”ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Norel Nuevo, Grace Gella win bronze medals in World Junior Bowling Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag View commentslast_img read more

Yanks Drop Verlander, Tigers, 5-1

first_imgNEW YORK — Even one of Justin Verlander’s best outings of the season wasn’t good enough to finally win at the new Yankee Stadium.The former Cy Young Award was beaten again in the Detroit Tigers’ 5-1 loss to New York on the night of Aug. 6, but considered it one of his best performances of the year.“If I can pitch like that moving forward, there are going to be a whole lot of positive outcomes to come,” Verlander said after allowing two runs on five hits in seven innings. “You’ve got to stay positive, and tonight there were a lot of positives to build off for me going forward: changeup, curveball, fastball location. There were a lot of things that were much better than they have been.”Verlander, who has never won in any of his seven starts at the new Yankee Stadium (including one in the postseason), surrendered solo home runs to Chase Headly in the fifth and Brian McCann in the seventh, the latter snapping a 1-1 tie. He struck out five and walked just one.“I’m not going to dwell on two homers,” he said. “Headley’s was gone anywhere, McCann’s probably not in a lot of places, but, overall it was a good game.”“I felt I threw the ball very well. These guys have picked me up a lot in the past, especially this year. They weren’t able to do that tonight, but that’s the game of baseball.”As they did in an Aug. 5 4-3 victory, the Tigers scored in the first inning via the sacrifice fly, after Rajai Davis reached on Derek Jeter’s error.That was all Detroit could generate against Chris Capuano, Adam Warren (2-5), who got the win in relief, and David Huff, who pitched a perfect ninth.Blaine Hardy took over for Verlander to start the eighth and gave up three runs to blow the game open.“Innings like that happen,” Hardy said. “We’ve got the ability to (come back), but it’s hard to come back from those. The Yankees got us today. Hopefully, we’ll get ’em tomorrow.”The Tigers were unable to tie it in the top of the eighth, despite two errors on the same play by Yankees second baseman Stephen Drew, putting runners at the corners with one out. Warren came back from a 3-0 count to strike out J.D. Martinez and got Nick Castellanos to fly out to right.(DOUG GOULD)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

How do you survive as an indie filmmaker We heard it from

first_img Facebook At NYFF 2016, a panel of accomplished independent filmmakers came together to share both personal challenges and keys to survival. It was a great mix: director Roger Ross Williams (Life Animated), cinematographer Ellen Kuras (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), director Ira Sachs (Little Men), and actor-turned-director Rose McGowan (Dawn). Each one of these artists is fiercely independent; each one of them has had to fight hard to survive. All value their own original voice far more than money or fame.So how do they survive in the indie world? A mix of difficulties overcome—part harrowing, part exhilarating—and wisdom gained. By the end of the panel, one thing was clear: none of these artists would trade creative freedom for the studio system, and all of them had advice for aspiring filmmakers. Below are the high points of their advice.Roger Ross Williams: “Be passionate”When asked what keeps him moving forward, Roger Ross Williams was insistent: “For me, it has to be a story that is so deeply personal, and so painful to make, that you have to do it. That’s what will carry you through the long journey as a filmmaker..” Advertisement Advertisement Take it from a man whose passion has gotten him far. Williams was not only the first African-American to win an Academy Award for a documentary short (Music by Prudence, 2010), but also the first African-American director to win for producing a film, short, or feature. He has since directed two independent feature-length documentaries, God Loves Uganda (2013) and Life, Animated (2016), both of which were nominated for and won numerous awards on the festival circuit.Williams started off in mainstream media as a journalist and producer for TV Nation, ABC News, NBC News, CNN, PBS, Comedy Central, and the Sundance Channel. He was miserable. “I like to say I’m a recovering journalist because I hated it,” he said. “I was frustrated working for the man.”He recalled covering the Sundance Film Festival in the late ‘90s and interviewing all the filmmakers in competition: Neil LaBute for In The Company of Men (1997) and Darren Aronofsky for Pi (1998), among others. This was a turning point. Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

The Thunders Problems Are Fixable

We’re only one-fifth of the way through the NBA season, but for those of you scoring at home, the Indiana Pacers and New York Knicks — teams that acknowledged they’d be rebuilding after failing to make it work with their all-star forwards — have better records than reigning MVP Russell Westbrook and the Oklahoma City Thunder, who were expected to be contenders after their blockbuster trades for Paul George and Carmelo Anthony.Just as mind-boggling: Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis in Indiana and Enes Kanter and Doug McDermott in New York — swapped for George and Anthony — are outplaying the big names they replaced, a notion that’s becoming harder to ignore as the season wears on.All of which raises two key questions: What are the Thunder doing wrong, and what fixes are needed to solidify the team as a top challenger to the Warriors out West?At the start of the season, the conventional wisdom suggested that the Thunder would be among the league’s most dominant offenses while sporting a mediocre defense. But the opposite has been true: The defense is doing the heavy lifting while OKC’s ball-dominant stars figure out how to not only coexist, but also thrive as a trio.Only a few possessions into the Thunder’s season-opener, against the Knicks, the team’s dazzling defensive ability was on display.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/thundersequence.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.When its defense is set, the club can force several extra passes by rotating seamlessly, forcing the opposing team to string out possessions.1Going into Wednesday’s games, opposing teams took a little more than 18 seconds, on average, to complete a possession against the Thunder defense after a made basket, according to advanced-stats site Inpredictable — tied for the NBA’s third-highest mark. With perhaps the NBA’s two best perimeter defenders (George and Andre Roberson) and a physical rim protector (Steven Adams), the Thunder — who rank third overall in defensive efficiency — will likely be among the stingiest, most disruptive defensive clubs all season.But as games drag on, that defensive dominance often fades. Oklahoma City leads the league by a country mile in defense in the first quarter, surrendering just 84.5 points per 100 possessions. But that number falls off with each additional period, going from 99.1 in the second quarter (fourth in the league) to 104.5 in the third (18th) to 109.8 in the fourth (24th). It increases to a whopping 147.7 in clutch situations, when games are within 5 points during the final five minutes of play (dead-last in the league).One key reason this happens: The aggressive defense that the Thunder use doesn’t work as well once Billy Donovan starts putting in backups, who lack the length and athleticism that the starters have. Oklahoma City relies heavily on switches — when players swap defensive assignments on the fly in hopes of neutralizing the opposing team’s pick-and-roll strategy — a scheme that functions fine when the first group is on the floor. But the slightest change, like Raymond Felton spelling Westbrook or Alex Abrines checking in for standout defender Roberson, can throw things out of whack.Notice, in the video below, how Felton opts to switch instead of staying with San Antonio’s Patty Mills. The swap leaves the 6-foot-1 Felton covering Rudy Gay, who is 7 inches taller — a mismatch that the Spurs immediately attack: Pau Gasol throws a lob to Gay over Felton’s outstretched arm.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/loboverfelton.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Another issue: Oklahoma City’s starting unit becomes an offensive liability in late-game scenarios if the team is behind. The group struggles to create good looks for itself in the closing minutes of contests, partly because of how teams are able to ignore Roberson, one of the NBA’s worst shooters. Watch here, in the final eight minutes of a tight game with the Clippers, as Roberson is left alone at the 3-point line — he doesn’t even look at the basket before passing the ball. Defenders don’t even bother to follow him out there; he is a career 26 percent shooter from deep and is 49 percent from the line.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/homealone.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Yet the biggest question facing the Thunder at the moment is the obvious one: Can all three of the team’s star scorers play together, or are they doomed to function as three individuals who wear the same jersey?George and Anthony were brought in to ease Westbrook’s burden — last season, the Thunder were largely a one-man show on offense and Westbrook broke the single-season usage rate record — and to give a club that couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn2Even when Thunder players were left wide open last season — meaning 6 feet of space or more — they only made 32.5 percent of their 3-point attempts. That was the worst mark in the NBA. some reliable shooting.But unlike the teams in the West they’re chasing — the Warriors, Spurs and Rockets — the Thunder aren’t synchronized on offense yet. Data from Second Spectrum highlights that Oklahoma City throws fewer passes than any other NBA team. And the club leads the league in isolation rate, according to Synergy Sports Technology, meaning that Thunder players go 1-on-1 more frequently than members of any other team. Each member of Oklahoma City’s star trio essentially takes the same number of shots each game, a rationing that would be great if it didn’t look as though Westbrook were harnessing his offense to make it that way. (Donovan suggested that Westbrook’s struggles this season stem from his trying too hard to make his new teammates feel at ease.)This isn’t the end of the world for the Thunder. Their 7-9 record is underwhelming, but their net rating and point differential suggest that they should have about three or four more wins than they do — a sign that things may begin to break their way. Beyond that, there’s some precedent to suggest they will be fine.The 2010-11 Miami Heat club that united LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had some things in common with this season’s Oklahoma City team. In addition to boasting a top-10 defense, the Miami trio struggled to play off one another until closer to the middle of that season.James, for instance, shot worse when Wade was on the court, and Wade shot poorly when sharing the floor with James. Both players shot better when playing with Bosh, but Bosh’s shooting declined when playing alongside either of his star teammates. (Anthony shoots far worse when playing with either George or Westbrook; Westbrook shoots considerably worse with George and slightly worse with Anthony; George shoots slightly better when playing with either one of his teammates.) For Miami, the trends began easing toward the end of 2010, and the Heat ended up making a run to the finals.The Thunder are probably banking that some of the offensive woes — Westbrook, Anthony and free-agent signing Patrick Patterson are all shooting career-worsts from the field — will fix themselves. But other methods might help the team’s ball movement and create better looks. Westbrook and Anthony have enjoyed huge success in 1-4 pick-and-roll sets (1.15 points per direct screen, according to Second Spectrum3The league average on such plays is 0.92 points.) and could turn to that more frequently. And it’s worth watching to see whether Donovan, who has implemented a handful of misdirection screen sets that involve all three stars (or just two when one is taking a breather), dials up more handoffs to get the players going downhill more often — a play type that the Thunder have used sparingly so far this season.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/movementthunder.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/pghandoffscreen.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.It’s still a bit too early to panic about the Thunder, even if they are playing sub-.500 ball and dropping close games. Based on what we’ve seen from their defense, if and when their offense gets going, it should transform them into the contender so many people thought they’d be this season.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more