“Employability skills” key for graduates

first_imgLinkedin Advertisement Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision TAGSeducationLimerick College of Further EducationPat Maunsell LCFE director News“Employability skills” key for graduatesBy John Keogh – October 30, 2014 859 Twitter Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning Print Previous articlePremier night party for film festivalNext articleSophie’s legacy John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebookcenter_img Applied Social Studies graduates at the recent Limerick College of Further Education graduation ceremony Applied Social Studies graduates at the recent Limerick College of Further Education graduation ceremonyTHIRD level research has emphasised the need for a shift “from skills for employment towards skills for ‘employability’”, according to Limerick College of Further Education director Pat Maunsell.Speaking at the college’s annual graduation ceremony last week, he said: “Today, one has to be a lifelong learner. You must be good at learning. Recent research emphasizes the shift from skills for employment towards skills for ‘employability. Skills such as good communication, interpersonal and ICT skills are crucial for success today because all jobs require them.”Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Mr Maunsell also said that the LCFE can play a key role in the region’s economic recovery.He continued: “This fast-paced world is constantly changing and the future will be challenging for all of us.  We live in difficult economic times where there are financial and other pressures on us all.  The indicators are though that things are picking up.  We believe that LCFE can play an important role in the recovery of the Limerick and Clare region and play a significant role in getting people back to work and onto to higher education if they so wish.”Almost 250 learners received awards in various disciplines and the ceremony, held in The Strand Hotel, was attended by more than 750 guests and graduates. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge Email Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launched Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards WhatsApplast_img read more

Hillenbrand Names Cerniglia As New CFO

first_imgCerniglia brings more than 25 years of financial experience when she joins Hillenbrand, Inc. in August.Hillenbrand, Inc. announced Monday that Kristina A. Cerniglia will be joining the company as its Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (CFO). She will report directly to Joe Raver, President and Chief Executive Officer.  Raver had launched a global search to fill the position following the planned resignation of the company’s previous CFO.  Cerniglia will start with the Company in early August.“Kristina’s deep industrial experience and insight will be a tremendous asset to our company as we work to grow both organically and through acquisitions,” said Raver. “As we continue to transform Hillenbrand into a global diversified industrial company, it is vital that we attract leaders with relevant experience and a proven track record of success in the industrial equipment space.”As the CFO, Cerniglia will lead the company’s finance organization, overseeing financial planning and analysis, reporting, tax, treasury, investor relations and internal audit.  Cerniglia will also play a critical role in shaping Hillenbrand’s strategy as well as leading the company’s engagement with investors and analysts.Cerniglia has more than 25 years of financial experience, most recently serving as Vice President, Corporate Controller at Stanley Black & Decker, an $11 billion diversified global provider of power and hand tools, mechanical access solutions, and electronic monitoring systems.  She brings specific expertise in global financial management, financial reporting, and acquisition integration.  Prior to Stanley Black & Decker, Cerniglia spent nine years at United Technologies Corporation in various financial roles of increasing responsibility.“We were diligent in our search for a candidate who fits with our long-term strategic vision and would help us achieve our goals,” said Raver. “Kristina brings a wealth of industrial manufacturing experience to the CFO position that we will utilize to drive additional value throughout the enterprise.”Don Allan, SVP and CFO of Stanley Black & Decker issued a statement regarding Cerniglia joining Hillenbrand:“I am proud to see Kristina join a vibrant, growing company with an impressive legacy like Hillenbrand as their Chief Financial Officer. Kristina has created significant value at Stanley Black & Decker over the past 17 years and I believe she will continue her track record as an excellent leader and business partner at Hillenbrand. We wish her the best in this new career opportunity.”last_img read more

LeBron James speaks out on Breonna Taylor and his frustrations with racial equity in America

first_img Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers That activism is ongoing. On Friday, More Than A Vote announced an initiative to raise $100,000 for the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, which will go toward paying the outstanding fines and fees of people convicted of felonies which are preventing them from voting. In 2018, Florida passed an amendment in its general election to allow people with felony convictions the right to vote, and MTAV has targeted aid to help affected people exercise that right. James’ Miami Heat teammate Udonis Haslem has been one of the regional leaders for MTAV on the issue.As teammate Anthony Davis said Thursday night: “When he speaks the whole world listens.”But James has also been troubled by many developments since then, including the election of Donald Trump who he has feuded with in the past. While Pew polls last month showed some two-thirds of American adults support Black Lives Matter and discourse on race in America has increased since the death of George Floyd, James seemed to question the notion that true progress has been made, citing profiling incidents he continues to see on video.“I mean, 2016 Barack (Obama) was our president. We know what’s going on now,” he said. “So is that that progress? I don’t think, I think we all can see and say that’s not progress, the conversation that’s being had right now, and how many people are really listening, or are just having conversations trying to make things happen? I think that’s progress, but we got a long way to go.”The Lakers have identified James as one of the most grounded leaders in their group as tension began to build last month and protests spread. Frank Vogel said on Zoom calls, James was one of the loudest voices in rallying teammates to action.Vogel himself said he’s learned a lot in the past two months from his colleagues and players.“I want to personally recognize that I’ve lived a life of white privilege,” he said. “So I don’t experience the same things that people of color have experienced throughout their life and with these conversations over these past few weeks, couple of months, I’ve heard story after story after story of incidents where friends of mine were profiled, and treated unfairly because of the color of their skin. And it’s not right.”James is clear that his is a point of view structured by being Black. He’s said in the past he has Black children that he fears could one day be subject to the same profiling and violence he protests against now.Related Articles How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThat sense of frustration fueled comments that James made after a Thursday night scrimmage against the Dallas Mavericks, a game that was largely inconsequential to start with, and even moreso after James spoke.He started in a way that’s been common in the NBA restart at Disney — talking about his desire to see charges brought against Louisville police officers who shot and killed Breonna Taylor in March. But it also was a meditation on how James, who has been one of the league’s high profile voices for social change for close to a decade now, has been frustrated by stops and starts, and even backward movement for what he views as progress in America.James has posted many messages on social media about Taylor, including a post last week that read: “Dear Breonna, I’m so sorry this is taking so long.” Other prominent NBA stars including Paul George and C.J. McCollum have thrown support behind Taylor’s family in the last week during media availability sessions, and James said he viewed it as a responsibility as one of the league’s leaders to do the same.“I want her family to know and I want the state of Kentucky to know that we feel for it and we want justice,” he said. “That’s what it’s all about. What’s right is right and what’s wrong is wrong. And this is a wrong situation that’s going on in my eyes and in a lot of other eyes, not only here in America but I bet in the world as well.”In the last eight years, James has been a key figure in some of the NBA’s most memorable calls for social justice, calling for more accountability for violence against Black people. The photo of his Heat team donning hoodies was a powerful statement after the death of teenager Trayvon Martin. In 2016, he, Dwayne Wade, Chris Paul and Carmelo Anthony gave a speech at the ESPYs challenging athletes to be more committed to social justice causes. Through his foundation, his I Promise school in his hometown of Akron, and an emerging voting rights organization More Than A Vote, James is commonly cited as one of the foremost athletes attempting to change the world beyond the court. Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. >> In LeBron James’ eyes, Black Lives Matter is not a movement.Before he was a world-renowned athlete a millionaire several times over, James was poor and Black. He and his single mother moved from home to home, and James nearly had to repeat fourth grade because he missed 83 days of school while weathering housing instability.One gets the sense from James that he wonders where he would be if he had not had the gifts and work ethic that helped make him one of the most accomplished basketball players ever. To him, Black Lives Matter isn’t a movement, subject to the whims of popular culture — it is a daily struggle for Black people to feel that their lives are valued in America.“When you wake up and you’re black, that is what it is,” he said. “It shouldn’t be a movement. It should be a lifestyle. This is who we are. … I don’t like the word ‘movement’ because, unfortunately, in America and in society, there ain’t been no damn movement for us.” But James also said he wants to see more frank and open conversations with perspectives that don’t reflect his own. The increasing divisiveness of discussions of race and social injustice are also something he wants to see change.“I think one of the best things in life is communication,” he said. “No matter what, if you could just sit there and talk to someone look at someone eye to eye and say how you feel, no matter if they like it or not. You can respect them. Somebody might not agree I don’t agree what you say. But if I can look you dead in your eye and you can you can look back at me and say Listen, to each his own, I don’t agree with that, then I can respect you out of that.” Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs last_img read more