“Employability skills” key for graduates

first_imgLinkedin Advertisement Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision TAGSeducationLimerick College of Further EducationPat Maunsell LCFE director News“Employability skills” key for graduatesBy John Keogh – October 30, 2014 859 Twitter Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning Print Previous articlePremier night party for film festivalNext articleSophie’s legacy John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebookcenter_img Applied Social Studies graduates at the recent Limerick College of Further Education graduation ceremony Applied Social Studies graduates at the recent Limerick College of Further Education graduation ceremonyTHIRD level research has emphasised the need for a shift “from skills for employment towards skills for ‘employability’”, according to Limerick College of Further Education director Pat Maunsell.Speaking at the college’s annual graduation ceremony last week, he said: “Today, one has to be a lifelong learner. You must be good at learning. Recent research emphasizes the shift from skills for employment towards skills for ‘employability. Skills such as good communication, interpersonal and ICT skills are crucial for success today because all jobs require them.”Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Mr Maunsell also said that the LCFE can play a key role in the region’s economic recovery.He continued: “This fast-paced world is constantly changing and the future will be challenging for all of us.  We live in difficult economic times where there are financial and other pressures on us all.  The indicators are though that things are picking up.  We believe that LCFE can play an important role in the recovery of the Limerick and Clare region and play a significant role in getting people back to work and onto to higher education if they so wish.”Almost 250 learners received awards in various disciplines and the ceremony, held in The Strand Hotel, was attended by more than 750 guests and graduates. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge Email Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launched Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards WhatsApplast_img read more

Winter sports notes: Rahlves draws a crowd

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson Formerly a speed specialist, Rahlves began to show podium potential in a third discipline last season, crossing third in the opening run of the giant slalom here. He then looked on the verge of recording his first career win in the discipline, leading at the final interval of the second run. But he lost control on the steep final pitch, hitting a bump at an estimated 45 mph, and cartwheeling into a full backward somersault. Italian Massimiliano Blardone took the victory, ahead of Miller and Kalle Palander of Finland. Rahlves walked away but the accident hampered his World Cup downhill title campaign, his bruises and sore muscles keeping him out of action for the following week’s Lauberhorn downhill. But the Chuenisbaergli appeals to Rahlves, known for his love of “gnarly” courses. The steepest and most spectacular giant slalom course on the tour, the Chuenisbaergli boasts some of the most spectacular and technically demanding passages. The traditional Chuenisbaergli is one of the classics among the alpine ski events, with races staged here 10 years before the creation of the World Cup circuit. Gate experts Benjamin Raich and Hermann Maier of Austria, as well as allrounder Miller, could unseat Rahlves when giant slalom and slalom races are run on the treacherous Chuenisbaergli course in Adelboden, Switzerland. Even if Rahlves doesn’t compete in Sunday’s slalom, he could still pad his advantage in today’s giant slalom. With the Turin Winter Olympics just a month away, competition will be tight as skiers attempt to solidify their chances of being selected for their national teams. Women’s skiing: Croatia’s Janica Kostelic was determined to compete at this weekend’s giant slalom World Cup meet in her native country, a day after hurting her hand as she fought to finish a slalom race without a pole and glove. “I think nothing’s broken,” Kostelic told state-run Croatian Radio. “It’ll be OK, I think. If I won’t be able to hold the pole, they should tie it to my hand.” Kostelic, a three-time Olympic gold medalist, finished third in Thursday’s race. She leads the overall World Cup standings ahead of Sweden’s Anja Paerson. This weekend’s giant slalom is in Maribor, Slovenia. During Thursday’s night slalom before her home crowd, Kostelic lost her pole and glove before the first gate on her second run and the flags repeatedly slapped her bare hand. Ski jumping: Jakub Janda of the Czech Republic and Janne Ahonen of Finland finished in a tie in points after Friday’s event in Bischofeschofen, Austria, the first time in 54 years that a Four Hills Tour ski jumping title has been shared. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img The World Cup circuit’s technical specialists will attempt to knock Daron Rahlves off the top of the overall standings this weekend. Rahlves became the unexpected overall leader last week, posting his second downhill victory of the season in Bormio, Italy. After 16 races, Rahlves has 489 points to American teammate Bode Miller’s 471. last_img read more

€135 million to be invested in Donegal under National Broadband Plan

first_imgThe roll-out of high-speed broadband to over 34,000 premises in Donegal has moved one step closer, according to a new report. The Government announced on Wednesday that works to finalise the contract for the National Broadband Plan (NBP) is well progressed.The report, which can be viewed here, outlines the high-speed broadband roll-out will cover the remaining one in three premises in the county, including areas such as Kildarragh, Tory Island and Glencar. The new will be welcoming for the many homes and business premises in County Donegal which are adversely affected by lack of broadband and many of which have been lobbying their local representatives for years to get the same services as their counterparts in the capital and major cities around the country.Cllr. Nicholas Crossan, Cathaoirleach of the Donegal County Council said: “Donegal County Council welcome the planned delivery of the National Broadband Plan and the associated substantial investment by the government.“We as a Council have worked in partnership with various telecommunication providers and government departments in the delivery of high-speed Broadband to 67% of the homes and premises in the county and this has resulted in significant investment and job creation in Donegal.“We are committed to continuing with this partnership approach to ensure that those living and working outside of the towns and villages already served will also receive high-speed broadband over the coming years, ensuring the opportunities afforded by the digital economy are available to all.” It is understood that Donegal will receive an investment of €135 million to provide fibre broadband to 34,107 homes in the Intervention Area.This is a mapped area of rural Ireland where high-speed broadband is currently not commercially available and it encompasses over half a million premises, including 56,000 farms and 44,000 businesses.Some of the many benefits of high-speed broadband include e-learning, remote monitoring of livestock or equipment, e-health initiatives, better energy efficiency in the home, more remote working and the availability of value bundle phone, TV and internet packages.€135 million to be invested in Donegal under National Broadband Plan was last modified: August 2nd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Pub numbers fall by 20% in Donegal

first_imgDonegal’s pub population has taken a hit in recent years with 91 premises closing down since 2005.The number of pubs in the county has fallen by 20.1% between 2005 and 2018, according to industry analysis by the Drinks Industry Group of Ireland (DIGI).362 licenses were renewed in Donegal in 2018, compared to 453 in 2005. DIGI say the decline in pub numbers is a stark reminder of the pub’s continued decline in rural Ireland, while many pubs were forced to shut up shop during the recession.The latest study of Donegal’s drinks and hospitality sector in 2017 showed that the industry enables 7,443 jobs and €168 million in tourism spend in the constituency.DIGI is calling on the Government to reduce alcohol excise tax by 15% over the next two years to ease the pressures on the pub industry.They say that pubs are a significant part of regional Ireland and play a crucial role as community meeting points in rural and isolated parts of the country. Padraig Cribben, DIGI member and CEO at Vintners’ Federation of Ireland said:“The number of rural pubs are down 20% in the period from 2005 to 2018 which is hugely worrying. This equates to 1,535 rural pubs which are businesses that provide jobs, a hub in the local community for socialising and community integration and a cultural powerhouse which is among the main attractions for tourists visiting Ireland.Mr Cribben added: “Considering this sharp decline in the number of pubs, we need to monitor this industry and ensure the necessary supports are in place to reverse this trend. While the Government committed to assist small rural businesses recover during the recession, business owners in the drinks industry were challenged by two increases in alcohol excise tax in Budget 2012 and Budget 2013. “Our high alcohol excise tax slows the growth of these businesses and impacts their day-to-day operations and bottom line. We are calling on the Government to reduce excise tax to encourage the growth of our drinks and hospitality sector, return money to Irish consumers and make Ireland more competitive internationally, particularly ahead of a no-deal deal Brexit.” Pub numbers fall by 20% in Donegal was last modified: August 23rd, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Life Pocket eases organ donation

first_imgCaroline Wambui with her technology teacher Damaris Mutati. (Image: OMG Voice)The death of her uncle was the catalyst and after being introduced to IT by her teacher, Kenyan teen Caroline Wambui has been on a mission to help ease organ donation in her country.Her uncle died because doctors could not find a kidney donor for him as Kenya does not have a national organ donor programme.Wambui – with minimal coding skills – has now developed Life Pocket, a mobile app that connects patients to organ donors, doctors and hospitals.“I firmly believe that Africa is going to be very far in a few years because of tech and how young people of today have turned to it to change life in our communities and countries,” she said.Technology could be a powerful tool if it was used to become a channel for change, especially in poor countries.The Life Pocket app will be rolled out nationally in Kenya in October.LEARNING THE SKILLSIn 2012, Wambui’s teacher, Damaris Mutati, started introducing technology into her classes at Embakasi Girls Secondary School, following her participation in the Intel Teach programme.It was here that Mutati was training to share her new digital literacy and skills, using the Intel Learn Easy Steps curriculum. She began to teach coding to the girls in her classes.“When you empower a young girl with tech skills, you broaden the way she thinks about herself,” Mutati said. “Tech also offers girls solutions while they’re still in school, so they come out knowing how to be job creators instead of job seekers, which is very important for African youths.”HOW THE APP WORKSWambui set out to develop an easy-to-use app on which users can easily register either as donors, patients, doctors or institutions, such as the Kidney and Lupus Foundation of Kenya and the Kenya Blood Transfusion Services.It features a login page, an about the app section, a donations page to identify and collect tissue and organs, and a feedback page for people who want to become donors.“I can’t wait for the app to be rolled out. It’s overwhelming and exciting,” she said.ORGAN DONATION IN KENYAOrgan donation is legal in Kenya but only blood relatives are allowed to donate organs to those in need. Exceptions are made for married couples, so long as they can prove that they are legally married.But in special circumstances, where tissues from potential donors do not match those of recipients, organs can be sought from people not related to the patient.“Thorough background checks are conducted to ensure that the organ is given voluntarily by the donor without any expectation of cash or other favours from the recipient,” said Valentine Imonje, CEO of the National Kidney Foundation of Kenya.Awareness is needed to demystify myths and misconceptions that hold people back from donating kidneys, eyes, livers and corneas, among others.“The app also demystifies organ donation. In Kenya, people get buried with their organs,” Mutati said.last_img read more

NBB Fair Trade Coalition succeeds in latest stage of biodiesel import cases

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) Fair Trade Coalition won a preliminary countervailing duty determination from the Commerce Department regarding subsidized biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia. The Commerce Department found that Argentina and Indonesia provide subsidies to their biodiesel producers in violation of international trade rules. In addition, Commerce found “critical circumstances” to address the post-petition surge of imports from Argentina, paving the way for the imposition of retroactive duties, going back to May 2017.“The Commerce Department has recognized what this industry has known all along —that foreign biodiesel producers have benefited from massive subsidies that have severely injured U.S. biodiesel producers. We’re grateful that the Commerce Department has taken preliminary steps that will allow our industry to compete on a level playing field,” said Doug Whitehead, chief operating officer of the National Biodiesel Board.As a result of Commerce’s ruling, importers of Argentinian and Indonesian biodiesel will be required to pay cash deposits on biodiesel imported from those countries. The cash deposit rates range from 50.29 to 64.17% for biodiesel from Argentina, and 41.06 to 68.28% for biodiesel from Indonesia, depending on the particular foreign producer/exporter involved. Cash deposit requirements will be imposed when this preliminary determination is published in the Federal Register sometime. In addition, based on Commerce’s “critical circumstances” finding, these rates for Argentina will apply retroactively 90 days from the date of the Federal Register notice.The NBB Fair Trade Coalition filed these petitions to address a flood of subsidized and dumped imports from Argentina and Indonesia that has resulted in market share losses and depressed prices for domestic producers. Biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia surged by 464% from 2014 to 2016, taking 18.3% of market share from U.S. manufacturers. Imports of biodiesel from Argentina again jumped 144.5% following the filing of the petitions. These surging, low-priced imports prevented producers from earning adequate returns on their substantial investments and caused U.S. producers to pull back on further investments to serve a growing market.Between the preliminary and final determinations, the Commerce Department will audit the foreign producers and governments to confirm the accuracy of their data submissions. Parties will file briefs on issues arising from the agency’s preliminary countervailing duty determinations, and the Commerce Department will hold a hearing. Preliminary determinations in the companion antidumping investigations are due to be issued in October. Final Commerce determinations will be issued later this year, or in early 2018, with a final determination by the International Trade Commission soon thereafter.last_img read more

How a Misinformation Campaign Altered the Debate on Climate Change

first_imgHolding fossil fuel companies responsibleExxonMobil’s conduct — promoting uncertainty about climate science it knew to be accurate — has generated public outrage and led New York’s attorney general to initiate an investigation into whether the company has illegally misled the public and its investors about the risks of climate change. This trend in litigation has expanded, and there are now several ongoing climate litigation suits.While important, lawsuits cannot fully address the larger issues of corporate social and political responsibility to acknowledge and address climate change. Just as Congress investigated efforts by the tobacco industry to dupe the public into believing its products were harmless in the 1990s, I believe a full and open inquiry is needed now to unmask the vested interests behind scientific misinformation campaigns that continue to delay our efforts to mitigate a global threat.At a minimum, the U.S. needs to change the system of hidden funding, in which companies such as ExxonMobil or the Koch brothers use pass-through organizations to camouflage donations to climate denial efforts. Current U.S. tax rules for nonprofit organizations, including climate-denying think tanks, do not require them to reveal their donors, enabling them to support large-scale political activities while remaining unaccountable. American voters deserve to know who is behind climate disinformation efforts, and revising nonprofit reporting laws is a good place to begin.In my view, the central concern here is nothing less than the moral integrity of the public sphere. The Declaration of Independence states that governments “derive their just powers from the consent of the governed.” But when vested interests with outsize economic and cultural power distort the public debate by introducing falsehoods, the integrity of Americans’ deliberations is compromised.So it is with the fossil fuel industry’s efforts to distort public discourse on the urgent subject of climate change. If corporations and public relations firms can systematically alter the national debate in favor of their own interests and against those of society as a whole, then democracy itself is undermined. I believe Congress can and should act to investigate this issue fully. Only then can we restore trust and legitimacy to American governance and fulfill our society’s moral duty to address climate change at a scale commensurate with its significance. Massive gap on public opinionFuture generations will look back on our tepid response to global climate disruption and wonder why the world did not act sooner and more aggressively.One answer can be found in the polarization of public opinion over climate change in the United States. The latest Gallup Poll shows that concern about climate change now falls along partisan lines, with 91 percent of Democrats saying they are worried a great deal or fair amount about climate change, while only 33 percent of Republicans saying the same.Republicans and Democrats hold very different views on climate change, as this 2018 survey shows.Clearly, a massive gap between Republicans and Democrats has emerged regarding the nature and seriousness of climate change. This partisan divide has led to an extreme political conflict over the need for climate action and helps to explain Congress’s failure to pass meaningful legislation to reduce carbon emissions. Why Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Won’t Lead to Action on Climate ChangeClimate Change Challenges the Human ImaginationThe Paris Agreement on Climate ChangeReport Warns That Climate Change Efforts Are Too SlowGood News Bad News With Climate ChangeHalf of All Americans Worry About Climate Change Just as predictedFour years after Hansen testified to Congress, 165 nations signed an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They committed themselves to reducing carbon emissions to avoid dangerous disruption of the Earth’s climate system, defined as limiting future temperature increases to 2 degrees Celsius. The signatories have now held 25 annual UNFCCC conferences dedicated to developing goals, timetables and methods for mitigating climate change, the most consequential of which are encompassed in the Paris Agreement of 2015.But as of today, not one single major northern industrial country has fulfilled its commitments under the Paris treaty, and the nonprofit Climate Action Tracker has rated the United States’ plan to achieve the Paris goals critically insufficient.There have been more than 600 congressional hearings on climate change, according to my calculations, and numerous attempts to pass binding limits on carbon emissions. Despite those efforts, the United States has yet to take meaningful action on the problem — a discrepancy compounded by President Donald Trump’s decision last year to withdraw from the treaty altogether.In the three decades since Dr. Hansen’s testimony, the scientific certainty about the human causes and catastrophic effects of climate change on the biosphere and social systems has only grown stronger. This has been documented in five Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment reports, three U.S. National Climate Assessments and thousands of peer-reviewed papers.Yet CO2 levels continue to rise. In 1988, atmospheric CO2 levels stood at 353 parts per million, or ppm, the way to measure the concentration of CO2 molecules in the atmosphere. As of June 2018, they have reached 411 ppm, the highest monthly average ever recorded.The effects of these increased concentrations are just as Hansen and others predicted, from disastrous wildfires in the western U.S. and massive hurricanes associated with historical flooding to extended droughts, rising sea levels, increasing ocean acidification, the pervasive spread of tropical diseases and the bleaching and death of coral reefs. RELATED ARTICLES By ROBERT BRULLE June 23, 1988, marked the date on which climate change became a national issue. In landmark testimony before the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Dr. James Hansen, then director of NASA’s Institute for Space Studies, stated that “Global warming has reached a level such that we can ascribe with a high degree of confidence a cause-and-effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming … In my opinion, the greenhouse effect has been detected, and it is changing our climate now.”Hansen’s testimony made clear the threats posed by climate change and attributed the phenomenon to human exploitation of carbon energy sources. Its impact was dramatic, capturing headlines in The New York Times and other major newspapers. As politicians, corporations and environmental organizations acknowledged and began to address this issue, climate change entered into the political arena in a largely nonpartisan fashion.Yet despite decades of public education on climate change and international negotiations to address it, progress continues to stall. Why?One reason for the political inaction is the gaping divide in public opinion that resulted from a deliberate — and still controversial — misinformation campaign to redirect the public discussion on climate change in the years following Hansen’s testimony. Polarizing public opinionThe current political stalemate is no accident. Rather, it is the result of a well-financed and sustained campaign by vested interests to develop and promulgate misinformation about climate science.My scholarship documents the coordinated efforts of conservative foundations and fossil fuel corporations to promote uncertainty about the existence and causes of climate change and thus reduce public concern over the issue. Amplified by conservative media, this campaign has significantly altered the nature of the public debate.These findings are supported by recent investigative news reports showing that since the 1970s, top executives in the fossil fuel industry have been well aware of the evidence that their products amplify climate warming emissions. Indeed, industry scientists had conducted their own extensive research on the topic and participated in contemporaneous scientific discussions.The American Petroleum Institute, an industry trade group, even circulated these research results to its members. By 1978, a senior executive at ExxonMobil had proposed creating a worldwide “CO2 in the Atmosphere” research and development program to determine an appropriate response to growing evidence of climate change.Unfortunately, that path wasn’t taken. Instead, in 1989, a group of fossil fuel corporations, utilities, and automobile manufacturers banded together to form the Global Climate Coalition. The group was convened to prevent the U.S. adoption of the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In its public statements, the coalition’s official position was to claim global warming was real but that it could be part of a natural warming trend.The corporate drive to spread climate misinformation continued beyond fighting Kyoto. In 1998, API, Exxon, Chevron, Southern Company, and various conservative think tanks initiated a broad public relations campaign with a goal of ensuring that the “recognition of uncertainties of climate science becomes part of the ‘conventional wisdom.’”While that coalition disbanded in 2001, ExxonMobil reportedly continued to quietly fund climate misinformation, funneling donations through conservative, “skeptic” think tanks such as the Heartland Institute, until 2006, when the nonprofit Union of Concerned Scientists exposed its funding scheme. ExxonMobil — the nation’s largest and wealthiest company — continues to work with the American Legislative Exchange Council, a self-described public-private partnership of corporations and conservative legislators, to block climate change policies. Robert Brulle is professor of sociology at Drexel University. This post originally appeared at The Conversation.last_img read more

The 6 Types of Documentary Films

first_imgThe documentary genre of film is a woven part of cinematic history. We explore the different types and share characteristics and examples of each.Top image via BFIWhat is a documentary? Webster’s dictionary defines documentary as “consisting of documents: written down.” After a better Google search, Wikipedia defines a documentary as “a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspects of reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction or maintaining a historical record.”It also opens into the history of documentaries while referencing Bill Nichols‘ classic text Introduction to Documentary, where he outlines the six modes (or “sub-genres” or “types”) of documentaries. While there’s a lot of variation within, these are the six main categories of the genre in which all documentary films can be cast.Poetic DocumentariesFirst seen in the 1920s, Poetic Documentaries are very much what they sound like. They focus on experiences, images and showing the audience the world through a different set of eyes. Abstract and loose with narrative, the poetic sub-genre can be very unconventional and experimental in form and content. The ultimate goal is to create a feeling rather than a truth.Expository DocumentariesExpository Documentaries are probably closest to what most people consider “documentaries.” A sharp contrast to poetic, expository documentaries aim to inform and/or persuade — often through omnipresent “Voice of God” narration over footage devoid of ambiguous or poetic rhetoric. This mode includes the familiar Ken Burns and television (A&E, History Channel, etc…) styles.Observational DocumentariesObservational Documentaries are exactly what they sound like — they aim to simply observe the world around them. Originating in the 1960s with the advances in portable film equipment, the cinéma vérité style is much less pointed than the Expository. The style attempts to give voice to all sides of an issue by giving audiences first hand access to some of the subject’s most important (and often private) moments.Participatory DocumentariesParticipatory Documentaries, while having elements of Observational and Expository, include the filmmaker within the narrative. This could be as minor as the filmmaker’s voice being heard behind the camera, prodding subjects with questions or cues — all the way to the filmmaker directly influencing the major actions of the narrative.Reflexive DocumentariesReflexive Documentaries are similar to Participatory in that they often include the filmmaker within the film — however, unlike Participatory, they make no attempts to explore an outside subject. Rather, they focus solely on themselves and the act of them making the film.Performative DocumentariesPerformative Documentaries are an experimental combination of styles used to stress subject experience and share an emotional response to the world. They often connect personal accounts or experience juxtaposed with larger political or historical issues. This has sometimes been called the “Michael Moore” style, as he often uses his own personal stories as a way to construct social truths (without having to argue the validity of their experiences).From there, within each sub-genre springs an endless list of variations and styles unique to each and every film. It’s up to the documentary filmmakers to craft their narrative (or non-narrative) for their desired audience.What type of documentary do you prefer? Are there any documentary types you think we left out? Let us know below!last_img read more

Gerald Anderson impressive in Chooks 3×3 debut

first_imgLATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:18Guanzon on third party issues: It’s always the guy’s fault00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss “It was a good game, pretty intense. This was my first 3×3 game,” Anderson said. “The team is okay, we just fell short in the last game but it was a learning experience.”Anderson also plays for the Shoemasters in the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League.Anderson said that he is honored to get the chance to play at an elite level in the Chooks to Go 3×3 tournament, which is geared toward helping the country make it to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.“It’s privilege for me to get to play with the best players in the Philippines. Just to be able to compete, it’s just a good feeling and such a big fullfilment for me,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next P2.5 B shabu seized in Makati sting, Chinese national nabbed Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 1 dead, 3 injured in Quezon road crash Take a l👀k at Gerald Anderson’s impressive #ChooksPilipinas3x3 debut for the Marikina Shoemasters 👟#Chooks3x3onESPN5 pic.twitter.com/PMKjotBvbE— ESPN5 (@Sports5PH) March 1, 2019 Gerald Anderson plays for Marikina in the Fiba 3×3 tournament. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOMANILA, Philippines—Gerald Anderson finally made his debut in the Chooks to Go Pilipinas 3×3 on Friday and he showed why he was worth the wait.Anderson was impressive in his first game with Marikina, leading the Shoemasters to a 17-14 upset of league-leading 1Bataan Risers in the group stages of the third leg at SM Fairview Events Center.ADVERTISEMENT Trump campaign, GOP groups attack Google’s new ad policy Hong Kong tunnel reopens, campus siege nears end Even with ONE bantamweight belt in his arms, Kevin Belingon remains hungry as ever MOST READ The actor made a good account of himself in his first 3×3 match, which is far different from the usual 5 on 5 game. He had 11 points in the victory, scoring his team’s last seven points to the delight of the sizeable crowd.The team that Anderson and the Shoemasters beat went on to rule the third stop of the tournament.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte P2.5 B shabu seized in Makati sting, Chinese national nabbed View commentslast_img read more