Housing meeting postponed

first_imgTwitter Previous articleOver €411,000 in funding for Limerick roads under Local Improvement Scheme says Fine Gael senatorNext articleThe Stranglers: No More Heroes anymore? Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Fianna Fáil has decided to postpone the public meeting on Housing which was scheduled to take place this Thursday in Limerick, due to the severe weather warning for the coming days. The meeting will now be held on Monday, March 26th at 8pm in the Strand Hotel, Ennis Rd., Limerick. The meeting forms part of a series of regional events on the housing crisis.for more breaking news click here  Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Advertisement WhatsApp Facebook TAGSFianna Fáilhousing crisisHousing meetinglimericksevere weatherwarning Linkedin Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Email Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival NewsBreaking newsHousing meeting postponedBy Bernie English – February 27, 2018 3685 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Print Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

Plants Outsmart Darwin

first_imgThere are wonders in plants that continue to be uncovered with the tools of science.  Two recent papers in PNAS lend support to the feeling that plants are smarter than assumed.Trash collection:  Humans usually only employ one trash collection service, but plants have two.  Four Chinese investigators found redundant pathways in plant cells for removing misfolded proteins.  Writing in PNAS,1 they characterized endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD), “an integral part of the ER quality-control system that removes toxic misfolded proteins via ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation” (see 11/24/2010).  They found two genes that “function redundantly” to ensure this essential process does not fail.  The genes are conserved (unevolved) in yeast, plants, and humans.Portable generators:  Humans know it is handy to have a power source, like a battery, when you’re away from the power grid.  Plants know that, too.  German scientists found that plants use potassium as a local energy source in their vessels.  Here’s what their abstract said in PNAS about how plants exploit the multi-functional potassium ion.2The essential mineral nutrient potassium (K+) is the most important inorganic cation for plants and is recognized as a limiting factor for crop yield and quality.  Nonetheless, it is only partially understood how K+ contributes to plant productivity.  K+ is used as a major active solute to maintain turgor and to drive irreversible and reversible changes in cell volume.  K+ also plays an important role in numerous metabolic processes, for example, by serving as an essential cofactor of enzymes.  Here, we provide evidence for an additional, previously unrecognized role of K+ in plant growth.  By combining diverse experimental approaches with computational cell simulation, we show that K+ circulating in the phloem serves as a decentralized energy storage that can be used to overcome local energy limitations.They called this the “potassium battery.”  They described how the model plant Arabidopsis “taps this ‘potassium battery,’ which then efficiently assists the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in energizing the transmembrane phloem (re)loading processes.”Neither paper explained how these systems might have evolved.  The paper on ERAD degradation of misfolded proteins only mentioned that the genes are conserved, and speculated in passing about the functional differences of the ERAD genes in plants vs humans.  Another PNAS paper by Harvard biologists, however, did speculate about misfolded proteins as a source of evolutionary innovation.3  Studying how yeast cells handle misfolded proteins, they recognized that there is a fitness cost involved, as if an oarsman suddenly disabled on a rowing team makes the others have to work harder.  What does this have to do with evolution?  Not much, apparently, and maybe less: it appears to constrain evolution, not advance it:These results underscore the distinct and evolutionarily relevant molecular threat of protein misfolding, independent of protein function.  Assuming that most misfolded proteins impose similar costs, yeast cells express almost all proteins at steady-state levels sufficient to expose their encoding genes to selection against misfolding, lending credibility to the recent suggestion that such selection imposes a global constraint on molecular evolution.Selection against misfolding is a form of stabilizing selection – a “running in place” process that tries to maintain the status quo, not the kind of evolution Darwin envisioned.  If most mutations lead to toxic misfolded proteins, plants need to be smart enough to get rid of them quickly and systematically, not tinker with them in random searches for new functions.    One can look in vain in this paper for any suggestions supporting old Darwinian ideas of progress, tinkering or innovation.  Quite the contrary: “Our study illustrates the value in isolating and quantifying the consequences of protein misfolding to understand their relative contributions to molecular evolution and cell biology,” they said in conclusion.  “The results support hypotheses that assume that misfolded proteins impose a selective cost independent of protein function and a model of protein quality control in which a small interacting set of proteins responds specifically to misfolded proteins in the eukaryotic cytosol.”  In the set of “hypotheses that assume that misfolded proteins impose a selective cost,” is there any reason to exclude intelligent design?1.  Su, Liu, Xia, Hong, and Li, “Conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system to eliminate mutated receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pas.1013251108.2.  Gajdanowicz et al, “Potassium (K+) gradients serve as a mobile energy source in plant vascular tissues,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1009777108.3.  Geiler-Samerotte et al, “Misfolded proteins impose a dosage-dependent fitness cost and trigger a cytosolic unfolded protein response in yeast,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print December 27, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1017570108.These papers have intelligent design shouting and Darwin whimpering.  Respect your garden by acknowledging the design so clearly evident, and honoring the Designer.  Don’t insult your plants by thinking they got where they are by unguided, directionless, chance processes of evolution.  It would be like insulting professionals for a job well done by shrugging your shoulders and saying, “Stuff happens.”(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ride to see Delhi’s Signature Bridge proves fatal for 2 students

first_imgTwo medical students were killed after their speeding sports bike rammed into a divider at the 20-day sold Signature Bridge in Wazirabad, north Delhi, on Friday.The duo died after falling from a height of about 30 feet during the accident that took place at 8.30 am Friday. Police have ruled out the possibility of stunt biking or a selfie-seeking angle.The deceased were identified as Satya Vijay Shankaran (25) and Chander Shekhar (23). It was learnt that Satya, a permanent resident of Ranchi, had completed his MBBS from Hindu Rao Medical College and was pursuing his internship, whereas Chander Shekhar was a 2nd-year MBBS student hailing from Delhi. The deceased Chandra Shekhar (left) and Satya Vijay Shankaran.As per the chain of events traced by the police, the duo went on a bike ride to the brand new Signature Bridge. While going towards Ring Road ISBT, the rider lost control. When Mail Today visited the spot, it was found that there was a gap between the divider and a police light wire was lying on the flyway.Police officials said they have not ruled out the possibility of one of the biker’s foot getting caught in a stray wire from the streetlight. The gap in the divider.As a result, the rider lost control over the bike and was flung in the air. The bike was left dangling from a railing and the riders fell.Police claimed that the two were not wearing helmets at the time of the incident.The much anticipated Signature Bridge, inaugurated on November 4, has been a hub of controversies ever since.advertisementThe Rs 1,500-crore project has been the talk of the town and not always for the good reasons.”The presence of skid marks highlights the possibility of over-speeding which led to both deceased falling off the divider,” said Jasmeet Singh, traffic DSP. He said that regular challans are being issued to prevent defiance and officers are working to keep a check.READ| Signature Bridge becomes Delhi’s selfie danger zoneWATCH| 2 bikers killed after bike stunt goes wrong on Delhi’s Signature Bridgelast_img read more